Monthly Archives: July 2015

Water Box Do’s and Don’ts

Do change the water in the water box after every pour. This allows you to look for gray slurry passing pistons, evidence of worn piston heads. It also allows you to monitor for leaking drive cylinder packing’s.

Do mount the water box cover with the mount bolts for solid stability. Especially after service maintenance.

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Do inspect Dog-Bone bolts for tightness. They must be secured with stainless steel tie wire, never with normal steel bailing wire.

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Do change the water box after long pours to help cool the hydraulic system. Water box water is used for 30% of the cooling system for hydraulic oil. Oil coolers take up the remaining 70%.

Don’t ever have hands or tools inside the water box while the motor is running. This reduces the risk of serious injury.

Don’t leave water box cover loose after maintenance or during use.

Don’t add soap to the water box water. This will wash the oil film off of the drive cylinder rods and will wear out the drive cylinder chevron seals faster.

Don’t leave water in the water box overnight or over long periods of time if there is danger of freezing.

Building a Counterweight Lock

Basic requirements when building a counterweight lock:
  • Weights must be at least 6,000 kilograms, but not well over. This could lead to a “nose heavy” boom when extended over the front.
  • The weights must be off the ground.
  • The pull lock cylinder must be retracted BEFORE raising the machine with outriggers.  The cylinder must be retracted to 2″ or less ( < 50 mm ) when the cylinder circuit goes to relief.  At this time the weight will still be on the ground.  When the machine is raised, with the outriggers, the weights will come off the ground.

Dimensions of the counterweight can be a simple block but can vary in many different shapes. For example, Putzmeister provides a bracket style with the unit. Regardless of the weight’s shape, how wide, tall, and deep the weight is should be calculated according to the material used.

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Rebuilding the Return Roller

First and Foremost clean all debris off shell and shaft and inspect for damage prior to building.

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Disassembly:

  1. Remove #6 outer from each end.
  2. Remove #5 outer from each end.
  3. Remove #6 inner from each end.
  4. Remove #4 from #2 at each end.
  5. Remove #1 from #2 by pressing from the opposite side of #8.
  6. Remove #8 from #1.
  7. Remove #3 from #1.
  8. Remove #3 from #2.

For reassembly, simply reverse steps 1 through 8.

Note: Click the image to view numbers.

How to Use Backup Controls

Understanding the functions on the manual backup valve bank.

Valve Bank: Most common with Gen 3 or Monochrome Screen, can also be Gen 4.

1

Stroke manually:

Short Oval Knob Handle: strokes drive cylinders. Push or pull handle and hold for the duration of one stroke. Truck must be above 1200 rpm.

Tall Ball Knob Handle: shifts S-valve. Push or Pull and release. Holding in position is not required.

2

Blue: Accumulator dump valve, manual operation button.

Red: S-valve cycle valve, electric coils driven by CCU, manual palm buttons on each end of valve.

Green: Accumulator pressure relief “Backup” 250 bar (3,625 psi)

 

 

Manual Valve Bank: Gen 4 Model3

Green: Drive cylinder stroke valve. Push or pull and hold in position for the full duration of one stroke.

Red: Accumulator dump valve manual override.

Blue: S-Valve cycle valve.

Hard/Soft Shift for S-Valve

4

Hard-Shift: In-line (shown)

Soft-Shift: Closed at 90°

Accumulator Bottle:

5Accumulator Bottle: 4 Liters

Pressures:

6

WP Water Pump Pressure: 190 bar (2,755 psi)

RW Auger Pressure: 160 bar (2,320 psi)

Manual Auger and Water Pump Valve Block: Applies to Both Generation 3 and 4

7

Green: Manual valve for water pump

Blue: Manual auger forward valve

Red: Manual auger reverse valve

8

Green: Manual valve for water pump

Blue: Manual auger forward valve

Red: Manual auger reverse valve

To operate auger reverse, both the Red and Blue coils or valves must be engaged.

How to Better Control a Concrete Pour

Discover the advantages that an EQV valve offers while pumping.

The Putzmeister Pipe Technology EQV valve, also known in the industry as a Squeeze Valve, Hose Shut Off Valve, or Air Cuff, prevents concrete spillage contaminating the job site and helps ensure a safer, controlled pour by quickly stopping the flow of concrete.

If one does not have an EQV valve, the alternative would be to physically fold the hose or stop the flow of concrete with a mechanical device, both of which can be unsafe and unreliable. The EQV valve is robust and flexible and is designed without any metal parts, minimizing the risk of injuries.

The valve connects to the concrete pump’s control box and operates off the truck’s air supply system. It opens or closes in a matter of seconds, opening automatically when the pump is started and closing when it is stopped. This makes it easy to use and a reliable method of stopping concrete flow.

An EQV valve is a great option to have when pouring walls and columns, when precision is essential. It is also useful if a pour needs to be topped off with just a small amount of concrete.

The EQV valve can be used with all concrete pumps, and retro fit kits are available to integrate necessary functions into pumps already in service. The Putzmeister Pipe Technology EQV valve can be used with end hose sizes 4″ (100mm) – 5″ (125mm). The valve meets or exceeds Concrete Pump Manufacturer’s Association safety standards.

Putz Post PM 4386-4 US

Telebelt Tunnel Skirt Adjustment

This Tricks of the Trade applies to all “active feeder” models below:

TB 110 – TB 130 – TBS 130

The tunnel skirts on Telebelts® are the parts that direct the material from the feeder onto the main belt. They are pinned in place and held down by springs and tensioning chains.

The tunnel skirts can be mounted IN or OUT, depending on job requirements. The IN position would be used for high-slump concrete to keep the concrete from running over the edge of the main belt.

The OUT position is used for low-slump concrete or other dry material. The OUT position exposes more of the main belt, to reduce “bridging” of material.

Steps to Adjusting the Tunnel Skirt: Moving the tunnel skirts is fairly easy and takes less than 15 minutes.

  1. Remove the boom cover hairpins at the rear of the boom, and fold the boom covers forward, exposing the tunnel skirts.
  2. Release the tension on the hold-down springs.
  3. Remove the hairpins at the tunnel skirt mounting pins.
  4. Pull the tunnel skirts back to remove them from the mounting pins.
  5. Move the tunnel skirts to the desired position, push them forward, and insert the retaining hairpins.
  6. Pull and pin the tensioning chains. MAKE SURE there is enough tension to hold the skirt rubber in contact with the main belt. More tension is usually required on the rear tension chains.
  7. Move the boom covers back into position and pin them in place.

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