Author Archives: putzmeister

Water Box Do’s and Don’ts

Do change the water in the water box after every pour. This allows you to look for gray slurry passing pistons, evidence of worn piston heads. It also allows you to monitor for leaking drive cylinder packing’s.

Do mount the water box cover with the mount bolts for solid stability. Especially after service maintenance.

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Do inspect Dog-Bone bolts for tightness. They must be secured with stainless steel tie wire, never with normal steel bailing wire.

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Do change the water box after long pours to help cool the hydraulic system. Water box water is used for 30% of the cooling system for hydraulic oil. Oil coolers take up the remaining 70%.

Don’t ever have hands or tools inside the water box while the motor is running. This reduces the risk of serious injury.

Don’t leave water box cover loose after maintenance or during use.

Don’t add soap to the water box water. This will wash the oil film off of the drive cylinder rods and will wear out the drive cylinder chevron seals faster.

Don’t leave water in the water box overnight or over long periods of time if there is danger of freezing.

Building a Counterweight Lock

Basic requirements when building a counterweight lock:
  • Weights must be at least 6,000 kilograms, but not well over. This could lead to a “nose heavy” boom when extended over the front.
  • The weights must be off the ground.
  • The pull lock cylinder must be retracted BEFORE raising the machine with outriggers.  The cylinder must be retracted to 2″ or less ( < 50 mm ) when the cylinder circuit goes to relief.  At this time the weight will still be on the ground.  When the machine is raised, with the outriggers, the weights will come off the ground.

Dimensions of the counterweight can be a simple block but can vary in many different shapes. For example, Putzmeister provides a bracket style with the unit. Regardless of the weight’s shape, how wide, tall, and deep the weight is should be calculated according to the material used.

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Rebuilding the Return Roller

First and Foremost clean all debris off shell and shaft and inspect for damage prior to building.

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Disassembly:

  1. Remove #6 outer from each end.
  2. Remove #5 outer from each end.
  3. Remove #6 inner from each end.
  4. Remove #4 from #2 at each end.
  5. Remove #1 from #2 by pressing from the opposite side of #8.
  6. Remove #8 from #1.
  7. Remove #3 from #1.
  8. Remove #3 from #2.

For reassembly, simply reverse steps 1 through 8.

Note: Click the image to view numbers.

How to Use Backup Controls

Understanding the functions on the manual backup valve bank.

Valve Bank: Most common with Gen 3 or Monochrome Screen, can also be Gen 4.

1

Stroke manually:

Short Oval Knob Handle: strokes drive cylinders. Push or pull handle and hold for the duration of one stroke. Truck must be above 1200 rpm.

Tall Ball Knob Handle: shifts S-valve. Push or Pull and release. Holding in position is not required.

2

Blue: Accumulator dump valve, manual operation button.

Red: S-valve cycle valve, electric coils driven by CCU, manual palm buttons on each end of valve.

Green: Accumulator pressure relief “Backup” 250 bar (3,625 psi)

 

 

Manual Valve Bank: Gen 4 Model3

Green: Drive cylinder stroke valve. Push or pull and hold in position for the full duration of one stroke.

Red: Accumulator dump valve manual override.

Blue: S-Valve cycle valve.

Hard/Soft Shift for S-Valve

4

Hard-Shift: In-line (shown)

Soft-Shift: Closed at 90°

Accumulator Bottle:

5Accumulator Bottle: 4 Liters

Pressures:

6

WP Water Pump Pressure: 190 bar (2,755 psi)

RW Auger Pressure: 160 bar (2,320 psi)

Manual Auger and Water Pump Valve Block: Applies to Both Generation 3 and 4

7

Green: Manual valve for water pump

Blue: Manual auger forward valve

Red: Manual auger reverse valve

8

Green: Manual valve for water pump

Blue: Manual auger forward valve

Red: Manual auger reverse valve

To operate auger reverse, both the Red and Blue coils or valves must be engaged.

How to Better Control a Concrete Pour

Discover the advantages that an EQV valve offers while pumping.

The Putzmeister Pipe Technology EQV valve, also known in the industry as a Squeeze Valve, Hose Shut Off Valve, or Air Cuff, prevents concrete spillage contaminating the job site and helps ensure a safer, controlled pour by quickly stopping the flow of concrete.

If one does not have an EQV valve, the alternative would be to physically fold the hose or stop the flow of concrete with a mechanical device, both of which can be unsafe and unreliable. The EQV valve is robust and flexible and is designed without any metal parts, minimizing the risk of injuries.

The valve connects to the concrete pump’s control box and operates off the truck’s air supply system. It opens or closes in a matter of seconds, opening automatically when the pump is started and closing when it is stopped. This makes it easy to use and a reliable method of stopping concrete flow.

An EQV valve is a great option to have when pouring walls and columns, when precision is essential. It is also useful if a pour needs to be topped off with just a small amount of concrete.

The EQV valve can be used with all concrete pumps, and retro fit kits are available to integrate necessary functions into pumps already in service. The Putzmeister Pipe Technology EQV valve can be used with end hose sizes 4″ (100mm) – 5″ (125mm). The valve meets or exceeds Concrete Pump Manufacturer’s Association safety standards.

Putz Post PM 4386-4 US

Telebelt Tunnel Skirt Adjustment

This Tricks of the Trade applies to all “active feeder” models below:

TB 110 – TB 130 – TBS 130

The tunnel skirts on Telebelts® are the parts that direct the material from the feeder onto the main belt. They are pinned in place and held down by springs and tensioning chains.

The tunnel skirts can be mounted IN or OUT, depending on job requirements. The IN position would be used for high-slump concrete to keep the concrete from running over the edge of the main belt.

The OUT position is used for low-slump concrete or other dry material. The OUT position exposes more of the main belt, to reduce “bridging” of material.

Steps to Adjusting the Tunnel Skirt: Moving the tunnel skirts is fairly easy and takes less than 15 minutes.

  1. Remove the boom cover hairpins at the rear of the boom, and fold the boom covers forward, exposing the tunnel skirts.
  2. Release the tension on the hold-down springs.
  3. Remove the hairpins at the tunnel skirt mounting pins.
  4. Pull the tunnel skirts back to remove them from the mounting pins.
  5. Move the tunnel skirts to the desired position, push them forward, and insert the retaining hairpins.
  6. Pull and pin the tensioning chains. MAKE SURE there is enough tension to hold the skirt rubber in contact with the main belt. More tension is usually required on the rear tension chains.
  7. Move the boom covers back into position and pin them in place.

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BOOM PUMP: Proximity Switches

Your Putzmeister boom pump uses proximity switches (aka prox switch) to cycle the pump. Some quick tips to keep them from being a misunderstood part on your pump.

 

What might go wrong?

Prox switches are screwed directly in to the drive cylinders and are subject to high pressure hydraulic oil. It is common to over tighten them, they take 14 foot pounds of torque which is a relatively low torque. Because they are in the pump hydraulic cylinder subject to high pressure oil they are quite often over torqued, this distorts the switch and it will fail early or not work correctly. The prox switches have a high pressure seal to handle the pressure subjected to them.

Next prox switches are grounded through the cable not the cylinder, so to test the system you can take a new switch, plug it in, touch it to metal and it will trigger. The switch works from magnetic principle, the piston is steel and the switch is triggered by this steel piston passing under it.

PMA Prox Switch Testing

PMA Prox Switch Testing

Deciphering the Light and Wires

On top of the plug you will see two LEDs one is green and one is yellow, The green one indicates that power is getting to the switch, the yellow one is the trigger signal that indicates the piston is under the switch sending a signal to the relay.

The prox switch wires go back to the distribution box, this box combines the signal to send it to the stroke change relay, LEDs are located at this box to tell you if they are working, you might have four or six switches on the standard units.

We encourage you to watch the lights when you are cycling the unit to clean the water box. You should see the yellow LEDs flash when the piston is passing under the switch; you have two switches at each position. They are working together as a backup which means if one fails you are still pumping.

PMA Prox Switch LED Lights

PMA Prox Switch LED Lights

Ways Prox Switches Fail

Switches can generally fail two ways, the yellow LED does not turn on when the piston passes under it, this is the most common failure. They can also fail by being stuck on. The yellow LED will be on even though the piston is not under the switch. In the first case no action is necessary, but if the switch is stuck on it will need to be disconnected from the system as it will interfere with the cycling of the relay. Simply unplug the one that is failed on, and resume pumping.

We all know that if it can go wrong it most likely will, this is the reason for the redundant-style system. However, quite often due to lack of maintenance or lack of understanding one switch will fail, then at some point the other switch will fail and now you have a problem. So familiarize yourself with the system and check it frequently so you can avoid being down due to prox switch failure.

PMAProxSwitch2

The pictures show a model used in the Putzmeister Service School class room to demonstrate the switches and the cylinder position, as well as, testing a switch not installed on a unit.

BOOM PUMP: Having E-Stop Issues? Simple Things to Check.

This relates to standard 12V units as well as early European 24V units.

Every component in your Control (aka Combi) Box should be labeled; age and changing parts without putting a sticker on the new part can lead to problems. In the image the decal shows 10A17, yours might say 6A17.

E-stop

Deciphering the Number

The first number, 10 or 6, is the page number of the schematic that you will find this component on. All components in the Combi box work this way; for example, 6F76 is the fuse for e-stop on page 6. The page number of the schematic varies with the options a unit has, or the amount of revisions to a particular unit. We can go into revisions later.

The letter, A, is the code for the part, A= Assembly, F=Fuse, S=switch, K=relay. Notice a German unit’s code letters are the same as English.

The second number, 17, is the assigned number for the device. Notice 10A17 and 6A17 are the same part just different pages in the schematic.

So You Are Having Issues With The E-Stop? A Quick Test Will Reveal Why.

Look at top left and find Terminal A1 (+), also in the lower right find A2 (-), putting a voltage tester at these 2 points will tell you if you have voltage. We NEED to use a voltage tester not a test light to see how much voltage we have here. Note: The red locking paint might need to be cleaned a little at the screw to get a good test.

For this relay to reset and hold you need to maintain 12 VDC, these 2 pins are powering a coil that is rated for 12 VDC. If you hit an E-stop button on the unit or turn off the remote, the voltage disappears and the relay unlocks, the 2 green lights go out and nothing works. So if you have no voltage here check the E-Stop buttons on your remote and if the local/remote switch is in the center position. A quick test for checking the remote is to set the local/remote switch to local and check for voltage. If the E-Stop resets and you have 12(+- 2 VDC), you have a remote issue, try your hard wire remote.

As previously, mentioned, always test with a voltage tester not a light, also test using the A2 (-) pin for ground, this is the ground the relay is using, If the wire from A2 to ground is bad the relay won’t set either. A quick check for this is: positive lead on A1, negative lead on A2 and look at the result, then move the negative lead to main ground in the Combi Box and look at the result. No or low voltage at A1 and A2, and 13.6 at A1 and the main ground point tells you that your problem is a bad ground from A2 to the main ground, follow that part of the circuit.

Voltage Drop

Most of the time the issue is voltage drop. I get a comment like “I get the E-stop to clear and start pumping then I hit 2 or 3 boom functions and it goes back into E-stop. If I do one function at a time it stays on.”  To avoid this or find the issue you need to test for voltage drop at A1. You can do this with the boom closed just don’t put the transmission in gear; have someone assist you with the remote, make sure the engine is running, PTO ON, not in gear on the transmission, this way you can activate the electrical components and not bend boom arms. That’s a different Tricks of the Trade post.

Check for the voltage at A1 then clear the E-stop by honking the horn, turn on the pump and see the voltage drop a little, next hit A arm, it dropped a little more didn’t it,“ then B, then slewing, then tip. Each function you activate is more draw on the circuit and at some point the E-stop relay will drop out. Not from a bad E-stop button but from voltage drop.

The problem is current flow. Look for loose or corroded wires in the E-stop switches or in the cable powering the remote receiver. Open the boxes and look at the wires, are they loose? Give them a little yank did it pull out of the terminal or sleeve? One common source for resistance issues is corrosion in the cable due to washing the pump with acid. Acid loves concrete, copper and chrome, it is not recommended to use acid to wash pumps. I have seen it turn the wires green as far as 3 feet inside the plastic coating, a major source for voltage drop. Poor grounds for the Combi Box and poor power from the truck are also big issues as the unit ages.

Take the time to do this easy test, if your voltage drops you can dig a little deeper to locate the problem and avoid future issues by resolving the problem now.

Do  Not Bypass E-Stop.

This is also the time to mention that bypassing the E-Stop is a serious problem, if the power is not at the A1 pin then even if bypassed the remote won’t work. This is due to the fact that the remote is being powered with this same circuit. So bypassing is not the best way out of problems it presents major safety issues and most likely won’t get you up and running on the remote.

As mentioned in the beginning, this is the basic start to troubleshooting the 12V Combi Box. If you have a 24 V ZMSK box the E-stop circuit is a little different, contact the Service Dept (800-890-0269), e-mail me (woodsa@putzam.com) or comment on this post and we can go deeper into the particulars.

Happy Holidays from Putzmeister

Telebelt Belt Card Adjustments

Putzmeister Telebelts give the operator the means to adjust the speeds of the main and feeder conveyors.  When adjustments are made to the belt speed knobs (potentiometers), a variable signal (4 to 10 mA) is sent to the 14A20 amplifiers. Depending on the input signal, these amplifiers supply 0 to 10 volts to the belt on/off relays, then to the 14A24 proportional amplifiers, known as belt cards.

The belt cards supply voltage to the motor control valves 14B36.  Feedback sensors on the motor control valves report valve position back to the belt cards.

Note: Older Telebelts have the belt circuits on schematic page 10. The components are 10Axx, instead of 14Axx.

All of the components in the belt card circuits operate on 24 volts.  The 12/24 converter is on the inside of the cabinet door.  The belt cards are protected by 24v fuses. All 24v conductors are purple.

There are two completely separate circuits (refer to A370160K, pages 6 and 14 shown here):

A370160KUNIFIEDCRTLBOX 06

A370160KUNIFIEDCRTLBOX14

Main belt:  A43.1,  14A20.1, 6K360, 14A24.1, 14B36.1

Feeder belt: A43.2, 14A20.2, 6K361, 14A24.2, 14B36.2

Older TB-105’s using schematic A383009 have the same components on pages 6 and 10. The component numbers are 10A20.1,2, 10A24.1,2 and 10B36.1,2

The belt cards have indicator LED’s and adjustment screws as shown.

TelebeltBeltCard

Telebeltbox

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Belt card adjustment may be required for component wear or replacement.  If the belt cards were swapped for troubleshooting, and not put back where they came from, adjustments could be off.

ADJUSTING CARD SETTINGS

The following outlines the adjustment of the four adjustable values of the belt cards.  All values INCREASE by turning CLOCKWISE.

Ramp Adjustments

“Ramp Up” controls the time it takes the belt to accelerate to its set speed, and “Ramp Down” controls the time it takes the belt to decelerate to a stop. Adjustment is from 0 –5 seconds.  Care must be taken if adjustment is made, since it is possible to have the feeder in a ramp cycle while the main is not running.

Factory setting:

1. Decrease all ramp screws (counterclockwise) to zero

2. Set ramp down on both cards to two full turns open (clockwise)

3. Set main ramp up to four full turns open (clockwise)

4.Set feeder ramp up to six full turns open (clockwise)

To be sure which way to turn the screws, remove a card and look at the adjustable resistor connected to the screws.  Turn the screws counterclockwise so the sliding “slugs” in the resistors move to the end away from the black face plate of the card. There are no stops, so there is no way to turn too far.  This is the zero point in step 1.

Max

The gain “MAX” screw adjusts the gain of the belt speed knobs.  To check these adjustments, time the belts while running them at full speed with the manual by-pass.  Next, run the belts with the remote to see if the same speed is reached.  If the belt is slower, increasing the gain will speed the belt up.

STOP increasing the setting when the belt doesn’t go any faster.  You can determine this by timing the belt, or just go by the sound of the belt.  Turning the gain screw up too far narrows the adjustment “window” on the belt speed knobs.  Therefore, if you have a belt that doesn’t run until “3” or “4,” and full speed is reached at “6” or “7,” set the knob at “10” and decrease the gain setting until the belt starts to slow down.  This will open the “window” back up.

Zero

The zero screw calibrates the position of the feedback sensor.  Whenever the e-stop circuit is reset, the LED’s on the belt motor controllers will be on.  The ZERO setting positions the valves so that the belts are not running.

If the ZERO is too high, the belts can “creep” or run slowly when the belt switches are off.  Pushing an e-stop will stop the belts.  With the e-stop reset, adjust by turning the ZERO screw counterclockwise toward “-“, 1/8 turn at a time, until the belt stops.

If the ZERO is too low, a speed setting of “2” or “3” might be required to get the belt to move.  Increase the ZERO setting until the belt just starts, then back off until it stops again.  Subsequent adjustments might be necessary, due to change in resistance from the rollers, scrapers or skirts.

TelebeltRemoteControl