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Telebelt Low Clearance Applications

How Do I Replace My Telescope Cable?

The telescope cable on the main belt won’t last forever. Two to three years is about it, depending on your cleanliness, maintenance and location (winter chemicals can speed the aging process). Equalizer cables last much longer and do not require the tension a main cable needs to effectively do its job.

Cables are fairly easy to replace, unless they have broken. For complete instructions on the TB 105 and TB 130 telescope cable, download the Summer 2003 PDF, Tips on Replacing the Telescopic Drive Cable (PMA-0010-6 TB). Use ONLY Putzmeister authorized cables. Some types of cable (i.e., non-rotating) are unsuitable.

When replacing the main cable, inspect all sheaves. The eight-inch (203mm) sheaves mounted horizontally will wear out on their lower edge first, so check your Operator’s Manual as some can be turned over before replacement is necessary. If the effective diameter has been reduced, cables will contact end frames. Best practices indicate having two sets of eight-inch (203mm) sheaves and bearings, as well as one set of 10-inch (254mm) sheaves and bearings, available when replacing cables, just in case.

TB 105, TB 110, TB 130, TB 600

Visually inspect cables as part of your daily operational routine. First, fully extend the boom. Then, lock out the machine and walk along under the cables.

Lubricate the cables with a penetrating chain and cable lube. The cable has a wire rope core, and penetration is critical. DO NOT use any products with graphite, as it softens plastic slides on the boom.

• Assess the wraps on the telescope drive with care. Also check the cable running from the anchor point (Dead Head) of the telescope drive, out to the tip section end frame and back to the drive sheaves.

Maintain telescope cables at 2,500 psi (172 bar) with the tensioning jacks. If you are between holes at 2,500 psi (172 bar), go to the next higher hole.

Watch for signs of a loose main cable during operation. This could mean that there is too much sag in a fully extended cable, or drive sheaves spinning in the cable wraps. Spinning drives create heat, which shortens the life of the cables.

Replace the cable as soon as possible if ANY broken strands are observed. Cable failure occurs shortly after broken strands are observed.

Why Should Your Telebelt Always Wear a Skirt?

Tunnel skirts act as a funnel to direct the flow of material from the feeder belt to the main conveyor. The TB 105, TB 110 and TB 130 all have tunnel skirts, or transfer tunnels located at the feeder transfer. Tunnel skirts are invaluable in ensuring that the flow from the feeder through the transfer and onto the main belt is smooth for more efficient material placement, a cleaner job site and easier cleanup at the end of a job. Due to its design, which incorporates a transfer hopper, the TB 80 is the only Telebelt that doesn’t need a tunnel skirt.

TB110-Arm_1

TB 105 Skirts:

  • Are adjustable as needed by tying the skirts back. This is made simple by using rope or bungee cords to tie the tunnel skirt’s handles back to the transfer stand tubes.
  • Do not require hold-down springs to prevent leaks because the material used is heavy enough to provide a sufficient seal with the belts.

TB 110 and TB 130 Skirts:

  • Can be adjusted in or out, depending on the type of material being conveyed, to expose more or less of the conveyor to carry material away from the feeder transfer. Adjust in for a more narrow exposure when conveying wet concrete, and adjust out for a wide exposure when conveying dry concrete or fill material.
  • Feature easy adjustment by moving the tunnels in or out on two sets of mounting brackets. This can be done in about 10 minutes without the need for any tools.
  • Use hold-down springs to make a seal with the belts that prevents any leakage of material being conveyed.

What Do Boom Covers Actually Do?

Boom covers are a factory-installed standard feature on the main conveyor belt of all Telebelt models and must be used at all times. They prevent material from leaking down onto the return side of the belt or into the structural parts of the boom. Boom covers are located on the base section of the Telebelt, or arm one.

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Why Are Boom Covers So Important?

  • Failure to use your boom cover can result in rock bounce if the belt is set to run too fast, causing rocks to fall through and ride the return side of the belt. This will ultimately punch holes in the belt and dramatically shorten its lifespan.
  • Boom covers prevent large rocks from getting stuck in the roller cradles, ensuring that when the boom retracts, trapped rocks do not bend the roller cradles.

TECH NOTE – BOOM COVERS

To determine if you need to replace your boom cover, stand under the base section and look up. If you see daylight between the boom cover and the main conveyor, it’s time to replace the boom cover. Please contact Putzmeister Customer Support at 1-800-890-0269.