Building a Counterweight Lock

Basic requirements when building a counterweight lock:
  • Weights must be at least 6,000 kilograms, but not well over. This could lead to a “nose heavy” boom when extended over the front.
  • The weights must be off the ground.
  • The pull lock cylinder must be retracted BEFORE raising the machine with outriggers.  The cylinder must be retracted to 2″ or less ( < 50 mm ) when the cylinder circuit goes to relief.  At this time the weight will still be on the ground.  When the machine is raised, with the outriggers, the weights will come off the ground.

Dimensions of the counterweight can be a simple block but can vary in many different shapes. For example, Putzmeister provides a bracket style with the unit. Regardless of the weight’s shape, how wide, tall, and deep the weight is should be calculated according to the material used.

12107927n
12107885n

Rebuilding the Return Roller

First and Foremost clean all debris off shell and shaft and inspect for damage prior to building.

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Disassembly:

  1. Remove #6 outer from each end.
  2. Remove #5 outer from each end.
  3. Remove #6 inner from each end.
  4. Remove #4 from #2 at each end.
  5. Remove #1 from #2 by pressing from the opposite side of #8.
  6. Remove #8 from #1.
  7. Remove #3 from #1.
  8. Remove #3 from #2.

For reassembly, simply reverse steps 1 through 8.

Note: Click the image to view numbers.

How to Better Control a Concrete Pour

Discover the advantages that an EQV valve offers while pumping.

The Putzmeister Pipe Technology EQV valve, also known in the industry as a Squeeze Valve, Hose Shut Off Valve, or Air Cuff, prevents concrete spillage contaminating the job site and helps ensure a safer, controlled pour by quickly stopping the flow of concrete.

If one does not have an EQV valve, the alternative would be to physically fold the hose or stop the flow of concrete with a mechanical device, both of which can be unsafe and unreliable. The EQV valve is robust and flexible and is designed without any metal parts, minimizing the risk of injuries.

The valve connects to the concrete pump’s control box and operates off the truck’s air supply system. It opens or closes in a matter of seconds, opening automatically when the pump is started and closing when it is stopped. This makes it easy to use and a reliable method of stopping concrete flow.

An EQV valve is a great option to have when pouring walls and columns, when precision is essential. It is also useful if a pour needs to be topped off with just a small amount of concrete.

The EQV valve can be used with all concrete pumps, and retro fit kits are available to integrate necessary functions into pumps already in service. The Putzmeister Pipe Technology EQV valve can be used with end hose sizes 4″ (100mm) – 5″ (125mm). The valve meets or exceeds Concrete Pump Manufacturer’s Association safety standards.

Putz Post PM 4386-4 US

Update on Telebelt Belt Circuit Adjustments

SETTING PRESSURES ON TELEBELT BELT CIRCUITS.

The main conveyors and feed conveyors of Telebelts are two separate hydraulic circuits.  Each has their own pumps, control valves and motors and they are hydraulically independent of each other.

The hydraulic pump capacities vary.  Different models have different pump sizes, depending on belt length.  In addition, Telebelts that have direct drive pumps (TBS) and automatic transmissions use pumps that have capacities that differ from manual transmission Mack counterparts.

This is about pressure setting, not capacity.  Capacity (flow) determines belt speed.  Pressure is the resistance to flow.  If the pressures are correct, the pumps should deliver the required flow.  Pressures are checked with pressure gauges, supplied with the machines when new.  Flow is measured with a flow meter, which is not supplied.

Again, flow determines speed.  A “working man’s” flow meter is a stopwatch.  Data sheets, provided with the machines show function speeds when the unit was in final test.  For example, a test sheet might show 65 seconds to slew the main boom 360 degrees to the right.  If you obtain the same results, with pressures properly set, you can be sure the circuit is still operating as new.

Some things that can affect speed are; low throttle setting, pump wear, motor wear and filter conditions.  You have the tools to check the pressures, so here we go.

Take all test readings from port M1A, for the main conveyor, and M2A for the feeder.  Ports M1B and M2B are load sense ports used by the factory.

There are two pressure settings for each pump.  They are the Low Pressure, a.k.a. “stand-by,” and high pressure.

 The illustration is a TB-110.  The TB-80 is controls mount the same way, but the TB-130 and TB-600 have the controls “laid down” so the volume control knobs face you.  As a result, the TB-130 and TB-600  M1A and M2A  ports face downward.

You will need the 60 bar and 400 gauges, supplied with the Telebelt, to check the pressure settings.  ALWAYS connect the 400 bar gauge first, since there could be more than 60 bar in the circuit of a belt that is not moving, depending how the belt cards are set.

Gauges can be connected when there is pressure on the circuit.  It is not necessary to disengage the PTO’s to connect the gauges.

Pressure adjustments can be made at idle, or just above.  It is not necessary to go to full RPM.

Compensator adjusting screws will have either a lock nut and Allen screw, or an acorn nut that, when removed, exposes a lock nut and Allen screw.  Release the lock nuts and turn the screws IN (clockwise) to increase pressure, or OUT (counter-clockwise) to decrease pressure.

On Mack Telebelts, the front pump on the driver’s side is the main belt pump.  The pump attached to it is the feeder belt pump.  On Telebelts with a transfer case (TOR, Sterling) as well as TBS units, the first pump is the main belt and the second is the feeder.

Setting low pressure, main belt:

  • Start the Telebelt and engage the PTO’s.

    Method 1: DO NOTreset the e-stop.  If the motor control valves are energized, false readings are possible if the belt card zero screws are set too high.  Open the load sense shut-off valve manual bypass.Alternate method:  Reset the e-stop, but disconnect the motor control valve connectors, pull the belt cards out, or remove the belt card fuses.  This will turn the load sense valves on, electrically.  Opening the bypass is not necessary.

    Either method will produce the same results; 1. Load sense shut-off open and 2. no power to belt control valves.

  • Connect 400 bar gauge to M1A and make sure pressure is below 60 bar.
  • Switch to the 60 bar gauge on M1A and read the pressure.  Compare this to the original reading on the test sheet in the front of the manual.  It will probably call for 20 bar.  If the correct pressure is not read, adjust the low pressure setting screw.
  • Remove the 60 bar gauge.

Setting high pressure, main belt:

In order to check high pressure, you have to cause the function to go to relief.  In other words, you have to stall the belt motors or block the flow to the motors.  You can cap the hoses to both motors, or reverse the lines to one of the motors, which cause them to turn against each other.  I prefer the latter.

  • Let the air pressure off the hydraulic tank (TB-105 and TB-110 only)
  • Reverse the hoses to one of the main belt motors.
  • Re-pressurize the hydraulic tank (TB-105 and TB-110 only)
  • Connect 400 bar gauge to M1A
  • Start the Telebelt and engage the PTO’s
  • Reset the e-stop
  • Turn the main conveyor on.
  • Gauge reading should be 280 bar.  Adjust as necessary.
  • Shut Telebelt off and de-pressurize the hydraulic tank (TB-105 and TB-110 only)
  • Return motor hoses to their original position
  • Re-pressurize the hydraulic tank (TB-105 and TB-110 only)
  • Remove 400 bar gauge

Setting low pressure, feeder belt:

 Use the same procedure as for the main, except test at M2A.

Setting high pressure, feeder belt:

Use the same procedure as for the main, except test at M2A.  To block flow in the circuit, cap the pressure line going into the feeder motor.  This is the line that DOES NOT have a “T” in line.

Current production pressure settings – November 2010

 Standby Pressure

Main conveyor pumps except TB(S)-130/600 = 20 bar,  TB(S)-130/600 = 25 bar

All feeder belt pumps = 20 bar

All boom/outrigger pumps = 22 bar

High Pressure

ALL PUMPS = 280 bar.

 

Placing Dirt With a Telebelt

Placing Dirt With a Telebelt

Placing dirt can be a problem. Depending on your area, you could be dealing with clumps, stumps and lumps, among other things.  Moisture content can also be your enemy.  Here are a few tricks.

If you are using the aluminum Front End Loader Hopper (part # A306000), try putting 2×4 blocks under the front pads. This will raise the discharge end of the hopper and expose more belt to take the dirt out and reduce “bridging.” You will have to tie the front of the hopper down to the rail, to keep the blocks from falling out.

This shows a Front End Loader Hopper with an electric vibrator (part # A309849) installed, powered from the accessory plug on the Telebelt.  The operator has also raised the back of the hopper to expose more belt.  Note the chain and binder in place of the rear pin.

Also note the feeder is set up with the legs down.  This is the best way to keep spillage from jamming the tail pulley. Some operators of the small loaders complain they can’t see in the hopper.  They’ll get over it.

The best hopper to use with large loaders is the 3-Yard Hopper (part # A300042).  When using this hopper, keep the bottom of the skirts even with the top of the concrete hopper.  Don’t lower the skirts into the hopper, as that blocks the flow.  When the lower hopper fills, flow will stop.

 

 

View at discharge:  The ideal setup is the 3-Yard Hopper feeding a Low Profile hopper (part # A306001).  The transfer opening is large enough, plus you are not beating the concrete hopper to death.

 

 

 

Side view of Low Profile Hopper under 3-Yard Hopper.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An optional hopper grate (part # A309979)  is available for the 3-Yard Hopper.  It is strong enough so loaders can break up clumps.

 

 

 

 

 

It’s hinged, on the front and has notched legs in the
rear to set the angle of the grate.

Telebelt Belt Card Adjustments

Putzmeister Telebelts give the operator the means to adjust the speeds of the main and feeder conveyors.  When adjustments are made to the belt speed knobs (potentiometers), a variable signal (4 to 10 mA) is sent to the 14A20 amplifiers. Depending on the input signal, these amplifiers supply 0 to 10 volts to the belt on/off relays, then to the 14A24 proportional amplifiers, known as belt cards.

The belt cards supply voltage to the motor control valves 14B36.  Feedback sensors on the motor control valves report valve position back to the belt cards.

Note: Older Telebelts have the belt circuits on schematic page 10. The components are 10Axx, instead of 14Axx.

All of the components in the belt card circuits operate on 24 volts.  The 12/24 converter is on the inside of the cabinet door.  The belt cards are protected by 24v fuses. All 24v conductors are purple.

There are two completely separate circuits (refer to A370160K, pages 6 and 14 shown here):

A370160KUNIFIEDCRTLBOX 06

A370160KUNIFIEDCRTLBOX14

Main belt:  A43.1,  14A20.1, 6K360, 14A24.1, 14B36.1

Feeder belt: A43.2, 14A20.2, 6K361, 14A24.2, 14B36.2

Older TB-105’s using schematic A383009 have the same components on pages 6 and 10. The component numbers are 10A20.1,2, 10A24.1,2 and 10B36.1,2

The belt cards have indicator LED’s and adjustment screws as shown.

TelebeltBeltCard

Telebeltbox

TelebeltBoxCloseUp

Belt card adjustment may be required for component wear or replacement.  If the belt cards were swapped for troubleshooting, and not put back where they came from, adjustments could be off.

ADJUSTING CARD SETTINGS

The following outlines the adjustment of the four adjustable values of the belt cards.  All values INCREASE by turning CLOCKWISE.

Ramp Adjustments

“Ramp Up” controls the time it takes the belt to accelerate to its set speed, and “Ramp Down” controls the time it takes the belt to decelerate to a stop. Adjustment is from 0 –5 seconds.  Care must be taken if adjustment is made, since it is possible to have the feeder in a ramp cycle while the main is not running.

Factory setting:

1. Decrease all ramp screws (counterclockwise) to zero

2. Set ramp down on both cards to two full turns open (clockwise)

3. Set main ramp up to four full turns open (clockwise)

4.Set feeder ramp up to six full turns open (clockwise)

To be sure which way to turn the screws, remove a card and look at the adjustable resistor connected to the screws.  Turn the screws counterclockwise so the sliding “slugs” in the resistors move to the end away from the black face plate of the card. There are no stops, so there is no way to turn too far.  This is the zero point in step 1.

Max

The gain “MAX” screw adjusts the gain of the belt speed knobs.  To check these adjustments, time the belts while running them at full speed with the manual by-pass.  Next, run the belts with the remote to see if the same speed is reached.  If the belt is slower, increasing the gain will speed the belt up.

STOP increasing the setting when the belt doesn’t go any faster.  You can determine this by timing the belt, or just go by the sound of the belt.  Turning the gain screw up too far narrows the adjustment “window” on the belt speed knobs.  Therefore, if you have a belt that doesn’t run until “3” or “4,” and full speed is reached at “6” or “7,” set the knob at “10” and decrease the gain setting until the belt starts to slow down.  This will open the “window” back up.

Zero

The zero screw calibrates the position of the feedback sensor.  Whenever the e-stop circuit is reset, the LED’s on the belt motor controllers will be on.  The ZERO setting positions the valves so that the belts are not running.

If the ZERO is too high, the belts can “creep” or run slowly when the belt switches are off.  Pushing an e-stop will stop the belts.  With the e-stop reset, adjust by turning the ZERO screw counterclockwise toward “-“, 1/8 turn at a time, until the belt stops.

If the ZERO is too low, a speed setting of “2” or “3” might be required to get the belt to move.  Increase the ZERO setting until the belt just starts, then back off until it stops again.  Subsequent adjustments might be necessary, due to change in resistance from the rollers, scrapers or skirts.

TelebeltRemoteControl

Telebelt Low Clearance Applications