Water Box Do’s and Don’ts

Do change the water in the water box after every pour. This allows you to look for gray slurry passing pistons, evidence of worn piston heads. It also allows you to monitor for leaking drive cylinder packing’s.

Do mount the water box cover with the mount bolts for solid stability. Especially after service maintenance.

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Do inspect Dog-Bone bolts for tightness. They must be secured with stainless steel tie wire, never with normal steel bailing wire.

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Do change the water box after long pours to help cool the hydraulic system. Water box water is used for 30% of the cooling system for hydraulic oil. Oil coolers take up the remaining 70%.

Don’t ever have hands or tools inside the water box while the motor is running. This reduces the risk of serious injury.

Don’t leave water box cover loose after maintenance or during use.

Don’t add soap to the water box water. This will wash the oil film off of the drive cylinder rods and will wear out the drive cylinder chevron seals faster.

Don’t leave water in the water box overnight or over long periods of time if there is danger of freezing.

Building a Counterweight Lock

Basic requirements when building a counterweight lock:
  • Weights must be at least 6,000 kilograms, but not well over. This could lead to a “nose heavy” boom when extended over the front.
  • The weights must be off the ground.
  • The pull lock cylinder must be retracted BEFORE raising the machine with outriggers.  The cylinder must be retracted to 2″ or less ( < 50 mm ) when the cylinder circuit goes to relief.  At this time the weight will still be on the ground.  When the machine is raised, with the outriggers, the weights will come off the ground.

Dimensions of the counterweight can be a simple block but can vary in many different shapes. For example, Putzmeister provides a bracket style with the unit. Regardless of the weight’s shape, how wide, tall, and deep the weight is should be calculated according to the material used.

12107927n
12107885n

Rebuilding the Return Roller

First and Foremost clean all debris off shell and shaft and inspect for damage prior to building.

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Disassembly:

  1. Remove #6 outer from each end.
  2. Remove #5 outer from each end.
  3. Remove #6 inner from each end.
  4. Remove #4 from #2 at each end.
  5. Remove #1 from #2 by pressing from the opposite side of #8.
  6. Remove #8 from #1.
  7. Remove #3 from #1.
  8. Remove #3 from #2.

For reassembly, simply reverse steps 1 through 8.

Note: Click the image to view numbers.

How to Use Backup Controls

Understanding the functions on the manual backup valve bank.

Valve Bank: Most common with Gen 3 or Monochrome Screen, can also be Gen 4.

1

Stroke manually:

Short Oval Knob Handle: strokes drive cylinders. Push or pull handle and hold for the duration of one stroke. Truck must be above 1200 rpm.

Tall Ball Knob Handle: shifts S-valve. Push or Pull and release. Holding in position is not required.

2

Blue: Accumulator dump valve, manual operation button.

Red: S-valve cycle valve, electric coils driven by CCU, manual palm buttons on each end of valve.

Green: Accumulator pressure relief “Backup” 250 bar (3,625 psi)

 

 

Manual Valve Bank: Gen 4 Model3

Green: Drive cylinder stroke valve. Push or pull and hold in position for the full duration of one stroke.

Red: Accumulator dump valve manual override.

Blue: S-Valve cycle valve.

Hard/Soft Shift for S-Valve

4

Hard-Shift: In-line (shown)

Soft-Shift: Closed at 90°

Accumulator Bottle:

5Accumulator Bottle: 4 Liters

Pressures:

6

WP Water Pump Pressure: 190 bar (2,755 psi)

RW Auger Pressure: 160 bar (2,320 psi)

Manual Auger and Water Pump Valve Block: Applies to Both Generation 3 and 4

7

Green: Manual valve for water pump

Blue: Manual auger forward valve

Red: Manual auger reverse valve

8

Green: Manual valve for water pump

Blue: Manual auger forward valve

Red: Manual auger reverse valve

To operate auger reverse, both the Red and Blue coils or valves must be engaged.

How to Better Control a Concrete Pour

Discover the advantages that an EQV valve offers while pumping.

The Putzmeister Pipe Technology EQV valve, also known in the industry as a Squeeze Valve, Hose Shut Off Valve, or Air Cuff, prevents concrete spillage contaminating the job site and helps ensure a safer, controlled pour by quickly stopping the flow of concrete.

If one does not have an EQV valve, the alternative would be to physically fold the hose or stop the flow of concrete with a mechanical device, both of which can be unsafe and unreliable. The EQV valve is robust and flexible and is designed without any metal parts, minimizing the risk of injuries.

The valve connects to the concrete pump’s control box and operates off the truck’s air supply system. It opens or closes in a matter of seconds, opening automatically when the pump is started and closing when it is stopped. This makes it easy to use and a reliable method of stopping concrete flow.

An EQV valve is a great option to have when pouring walls and columns, when precision is essential. It is also useful if a pour needs to be topped off with just a small amount of concrete.

The EQV valve can be used with all concrete pumps, and retro fit kits are available to integrate necessary functions into pumps already in service. The Putzmeister Pipe Technology EQV valve can be used with end hose sizes 4″ (100mm) – 5″ (125mm). The valve meets or exceeds Concrete Pump Manufacturer’s Association safety standards.

Putz Post PM 4386-4 US

Belt(s) won’t run? I’ll bet it’s not the pump.

Belt(s) won’t run?  I’ll bet it’s not the pump.

2 of 3 – Hydraulic

This is the second of three articles about Telebelt belt-related problems.

From time to time, I get calls involving a belt that won’t run, or runs very slowly.  The call I like the least is, “My feeder (or main) belt quit running.  I replaced the pump, but it still won’t run.”

With over 800 Telebelts in the field, we are looking at more than 2,100 piston pumps.  We don’t hear of pump failures very often.

So, again, I’ll bet it’s not the pump.

Rule # 1 – Check to see if it will run with manual control.  If it will, the problem is probably electrical or in the radio.  If not, it’s mechanical or hydraulic.

Things that stop belts:

  •  Mechanical problems
  • Electrical problems
  • Hydraulic problems
  • Truck or engine failure (this is beyond the scope of this series)

 

Let’s deal with hydraulic problems.  By now you should have observed Rule #1 and you know the problem is not electrical and you cannot run manually.

 

Is there any pressure on the belt circuit, main or feeder?

If one belt is working, but one is not, connect a 400 bar gauge to the “M” test port for the belt that is not working.  This is explained in your manuals in the maintenance section.

  • Always hook up the 400 bar gauge first.  If there is over 60 bar you will blow your 60 bar gauge.
  • If neither belt is working, double check that the driver-side PTO shaft is turning.  This is just about the only thing that could cause both belt pumps to quit together.
  • If the belt works under normal load but stalls under a very heavy load, a larger displacement motor might be required.  Example: Feeders have motors that deliver optimum output under normal conditions.  Extreme loads, i.e. paving, might require larger motors with more torque.  Use a pressure gauge to see if the belt stalls at full pressure (280 bar) or if it has no pressure when it quits.

 

Is there pressure below 60 bar?

  • If it is below 60 bar, connect your 60 bar gauge.
  • Disconnect the square plug on the motor control valve for the pump you are working.  Another way would be to pull the belt card or belt card fuse for the pump you are working on.  This will insure you are not getting a false reading from belt card zero.
  • You will now be able to read standby (low) pressure.

 

Is there pressure above 60 bar?

  • Disconnect the square plug on the motor control valve for the pump you are working.  Another way would be to pull the belt card or belt card fuse for the pump you are working on.  This will insure you are not getting a false reading from belt card zero.
  • When the pressure drops below 60 bar, connect your 60 bar gauge.
  • You will now be able to read standby (low) pressure.

Location of Valves and Power Plugs

 

 

 

 

Belt Card Location

Belt Card Fuse Location

 

Is the pressure below 20 bar?

Using the prssure setting procedure in the manual, set standby to:

  • All feeder belts – 20 bar
  • Main belts except TB and TBS 130/600 – 20 bar
  • Main belts TB and TBS 130/600 – 25 bar
  • Boom/Outrigger pumps – 22 bar

 

Are the standby pressures low or erratic?

  •  This could indicate broken springs or a stuck standby spool.  Lightly tap the control valve (compensator) with a hammer – this often frees stuck spools.
  • Screw the pressure adjusting screw all the way in – this will override broken springs.
  • If these steps don’t work, shut the machine off.  Release air pressure on pressurized tank units.  Remove the low pressure spool and check for contamination or scoring.
  • If you think you have a bad compensator, swap it with the other belt pump and see if the problem changes to the other circuit.  (This can’t be done with the 140CC main belt pumps on a TB-130)

Note:  Compensator (control valve) problems are often the cause of pump “failures.”  A pump with low or no standby pressure will not come on stroke.  Repairing or replacing the compensator often does the trick.

 

If the standby pressure can be set:
Using the procedure in the manuals, check and set high pressure.  All pumps are set to 280 bar for high pressure.

  • If high pressure cannot be reached, eliminate problems that can cause this:
    • Motor leakage
    • Piston packing leaks
    • Valve spool leakage
    • Counterbalance or relief valve leakage

 

If you get this far, it might actually be the pump
The only way to truly test a pump is with a flow meter.  Even a bad pump delivers flow until back pressure is applied. You can also get a rough idea of pump condition by checking function times.

  • Time your belts to determine belt speed
  • Compare this to the times recorded on the pump test page, in the front of your manual
  • Rule of thumb; Main belts usually run 900 feet/min when delivered.  Feeders usually run 1,000 feet/minute.  If you get a low reading, check the motor(s) to make sure they haven’t been changed to a higher displacement.
  • You can also use function times to determine changes in the boom/outrigger pump.
  • A flow meter can also be used to check leakage rates from the pump case drain.

Last minute update:

 

A problem, with a customer’s TB-130, has been plaguing all involved for the last month.  They shelled the boom/outrigger circuit pump.  This was a true pump failure; what we call “grenading itself.”

After cleaning the system and installing a new pump, the circuit would work for a short time, and then the pressure would drop off.  Pushing and releasing the clutch would bring the pressure back, and then it would drop off, again.  Compensators, inlet modules, WBV valves and a second pump were tried, without any change.  The customer even took parts off a working TB-110 and the problem remained.  Three of us, at Putzmeister, with over 100 years of combined experience were convinced it was a problem in the boom control valves.

In desperation, Alan went back to the schematic.  Something we had not considered jumped out at him; the contingency pump circuit.  This is the small electric motor and pump that allow the boom to be raised, so the cab can be tipped, if the engine won’t start.  It feeds the boom circuit through a check valve.  The check valve poppet had hammered itself out of shape and it was allowing circuit flow back through the small pump.

This reinforces: 1) the value of the schematic, 2) the K.I.S.S. theory and 3) the “I’ll bet it’s not the pump” statement.

Putzmeister Boom Valve Coil Tips

I have a little more homework and Info for you guys.

Over the years we all have had issues with setting and adjusting the boom speeds, either to fast or to slow, the function can feel rough or jerky or even black and white. Some have tried to repeatedly adjust the boom speeds with the Teleteach buttons or battery to no good result. If you need to constantly teach the remote you generally have a remote issue, other than oil temp variance the settings should stay relatively the same, week to week.

But there is another option you can easily look at for these types of symptoms.

The joystick is communicating to the coil on the boom valve, the coils can wear out, as they draw more Amps the range of motion changes, thus the need to adjust from time to time.

The plunger spool’s that the coil’s drive can also get sticky or gummed up over time. The images below will show you how to remove and clean the spools, test the coils, and look for issues. The coils are the same from valve to valve, so they can be moved around. BUT BEWARE, on units equipped with EBC this is not advisable, the computer is set to work with the coil and valve matched, adjustments to the EBC programming might need to be reset if coils are changed or moved around.

The leading problem we have with Mother Boards on 24 V systems is over Amping the fuse. If an outrigger or Boom coil is bad it can draw high amps and blow the fuse.  DO NOT PUT IN A BIGGER FUSE, RUN THE FUNCTION MANUALY AND FIX THE ISSUE.

 Other issues that can give you problems with these spools and other components on the unit are cheap oil, dirty oil, water in the oil, and high “TAN” numbers. These all lead to corrosion and sticky components all over the unit. Phantom issues that come and go are usually related to the oil and its condition. Do oil sample testing to ensure the condition of your oil. Oil that has water in it looks milky ONLY after it has become saturated with to much water, clear oil in the sight gauge can still have to much water in it. The only way to know for sure is to have it tested.

 

I hope this helps and brings out even more questions, please feel free to ask online or call PM CSG at 1-800-890-0269, or myself at 360-600-5695, or reach me by email at woodsa@putzam.com.

 

As always, be safe and keep the rubber side down.

Travelteck

 


PICTURE 1:
Coils are located behind the Boom valves. All the coils on a unit are the same, they can be swapped if needed.

Example: the Coil for the Boom / Outrigger is having issues, the Coil from the B arm could be used to swap with the Boom / Outrigger to get through a job.

Units with EBC rely on adjustments to compensate for coil resistance. On unit’s equipped with EBC you can change coils but EBC might need to be readjusted for the new coil. Without EBC there would not be an issue, but swapping coils to diagnose is not recommended on functioning EBC units.

High resistance values or shorted coils are one of the leading killers of Motherboards, NEVER over amp a fuse to make a function work even if it is for a “short time”, the motherboard will become the next fuse. Remember, everything you turn on with an electrical switch can be run MANUALY.

Q&A Session – Question 4: Whats wrong with after-market parts and solutions for my Telebelt?

Nothing, as long as they don’t affect the over-all performance of the machine or threaten other more expensive components. Take a look at the photo to the right of a drive pulley cover on a TB105 for example; it is strong and strongly mounted, so strong in fact that it has been responsible for stalling belts for the lucky and wrecking belts for the un-lucky! The intended and designed reason for a cover in this area is just to keep the hose bundle away from the drive pulley. The original solution was just a piece of steel tube bolted across the center and later ended being a piece of UHMW (plastic). The advantage of the plastic is that in the case of a rock or other object getting caught between the belt and the cover, the hundred dollar cover looses not the more expensive main belt. You can finish the day’s placing without the pulley cover but not without the belt! After loosing a main belt, ask your self how much does that cover cost and how nice does it look?

The last photo is of some of the items we at the Putzmeister Repair and Service Center have run across or removed while doing repairs. A single ply belt has never been factory installed on a production TB model of any kind. Why? Because they do not work! Obviously a customer bought what the belt guy was selling. We have never found a method of patching a belt that had any longevity. Any belt patch is a “stop gap” measure at best and neither one of these two even make that grade! Belt strength is rated in pounds per inch of width (P.I.W.). If you cut the belt all the way through the fabric anywhere you have reduced the P.I.W. of the belt. If you cut a big six inch “V” out of the eighteen inch belt, as in the lower sample, you have reduced the belts strength by at least a third. We are not even going to mention that the cut and the patch are within the profile of the scraper! Not only is the scraper blade in the photo just a piece of steel that is not even straight, it is also too long!

In closing, Putzmeister America understands. We know especially considering todays economic times, that rising costs and harder to find work make everyday maintenance and parts replacement a real concern for making ends meet. In an effort to show our understanding and keep us and our customer’s competitive, Putzmeister America’s Customer Support Group has just recently reduced Telebelt parts across the entire line by 15%! In addition, the competitive rates and flexible schedule of our Midwest Repair and Service Center further help you get quality parts with quality, experienced installation. So, next time you need repairs or parts on your Telebelt, please consider the “real” cost of what you are having installed. Both our reputations depend on the quality of those parts.

Q&A Session- Question 2: I am constantly approached by people selling belt, why should I use Putzmeister belting?

ANSWER:

Putzmeister belts have a long track record and proven history of performance. The material specifications and splice procedures are intended for concrete conveyors and the Telebelt application. These details have evolutionized over many years of trail, research, testing, design, and actual use and application. Other belts made with other materials have been tried and tested over those years, and none of the alternatives have ever measured up in longevity. The splice design and methods have changed many times over the years, and Putzmeister has updated the splice design as recently as a couple of years ago.

We have had long-time loyal customers try “bargain” priced belt and most or all of them have come back to using Putzmeister belting and splicing. We have tried everything from urethane belts to “poly” and “poly-blend” fabric belts. We have experimented with “cold splices” and countless variations of splice prep and have always come back to the vulcanized, step and bias splice presently used because of longevity as related to application.

Those of you that have also tried alternative belts and splice methods may have heard that our pulleys are too small. Our chosen belt and splice design takes in to account the size of the pulleys and the fact that we have an aggressive and effective scraper. The splice design reduces that amount of splice area that is going around a pulley or across the scraper. It is a good “rule of thumb” to remember when talking to a belt salesman that that is exactly what he is, a belt salesman. We are an equipment manufacturer that builds machines that use belts, and therefore have a vested interest in how that belt performs in our machine. Our reputation and that of our product depend on it! Some old time worn clichés may apply when shopping for belting;

  1. If it sounds too good to be true it probably is.
  2. Sometimes you do get what you pay for.
  3. And…..Buyer beware.

We realize that technology does change and our industry is no different. We are alert and open minded to product improvement if and when changing technology offers it. However, until any “better mouse-trap” has a field track record that can compare remotely to the forty years plus of design, testing and field application of our present belting and splice design and methods, we humbly recommend that our customers go with a known commodity when considering replacement belts for their Telebelt.

Q&A Session- Question 1: Why are there 16″ scraper blades on an 18″ belt?

ANSWER:

Telebelts are equipped with “crowned” pulleys. Slightly tapered pulleys allow for easier adjustment when training or tracking of the belt. This is especially true on faster moving belts such as those used to place concrete. This feature is even more important for the purposes of belt training when the conveyor is telescopic, multi-section as is the Telebelt. Trust me, flat pulleys were tried in the very early design and training the belt throughout the telescope range was impossible! Even when only half the pulleys were flat it was still an impossible task to track the belt.

When a tensioned belt wraps around a tapered pulley it leaves that pulley with its edges opposite the pulley taper. That is to say the belt comes off the pulley in a crescent shape, with edges of the belt somewhat lower than the center (see diagram 1, left). For this reason, using a scraper as wide as the belt wears out the edges of the belt pre-maturely.

Getting proper surface tension between the blade and the belt also becomes more difficult because the force being used to pull the scraper against the belt has to deflect the edge of the belt that much more before adding any appreciable force in the middle or center (once again see diagram 1). This problem becomes worse the further behind the pulley the scraper is mounted. This is because you now have to deflect the tensioned belt in both directions, width and length, before significantly effecting the tension of the blade against the surface of the belt (see diagram 2, below, – upper right-hand corner).

You may have read in some of our past literature words like belt “flutter” and scraper “bounce”. These are also symptoms of the scraper being too far behind the pulley. A mistimed or an unlucky scraper bounce can catch a rock and render the scraper useless, or worse wreck a belt! A “fluttering” belt will not run clean. In all cases, an 18” blade on an 18” belt makes every condition or symptom worse!

When you hear customers saying things like; “I just can’t get that thing to run clean no matter how much I tension the scraper!” or “My scraper springs are stretching and I have run out of adjustment on the scraper chains or T-handles!”, the main two causes are scraper blades that are too wide and scrapers that are too far behind the pulley.

Besides these problems, you have to ask why do you want to clean the belt out that wide anyway? The tunnels, even on a machine set up for high volume placing, will only expose a max of 12” or 14” of belt, and most are set up with only about 9” to 11” of belt exposed. The material leaves these transfer skirts on a “V” shaped belt and the material profile on the belt doesn’t reach to those outside edges of the belt. If the concrete is so liquid that the material profile within that the normal “V” shape or in the discharge transition area reaches the edges of the belt, more than likely the belt is running too slow or there is too much belt exposed between the skirts or both. The bottom-line is that on a machine that is properly set up and run, there is nothing out on the last inch of belt on both sides to clean!

The only historical leg to stand on in defense of same width blades and belts is that the earliest Telebelt model I mentioned earlier ran 16” blades with a 16” belt. There are couple reasons for this. Firstly, that machine ran 4” pulleys and they just were not as aggressively tapered, lessening the severity of the systems described above. Second, and the most reality based reason, is that the manufacture just never got around to making a 14” scraper blade (assigning a whole new part number, etc). Every other concrete conveyor built used the ‘2” narrower than belt width scraper blade’, up to and past 48” belts. So, the only machine that ever used same width scrapers did so because the manufacture just never got around to making a 14” blade with some of its components allowing it to get away with that oversight. That doesn’t make it correct!