Q&A Session – Question 3: Why use Putzmeister rollers in my Telebelt?

Using the right rollers in the correct position is very important to the life of the belts and the over-all performance of the Telebelt. Once again, the location and design of our rollers are a product of years of experience and practical application. Building a “cheaper” roller is not always in the best interest of practical application.
This can be the case if roller design and fabrication cost savings end up producing a design that threatens the integrity and longevity of more costly components, such as belts. This can also be the case if new approach or design just does not perform as well. As an example, our hopper roller design prevents the belt from being “pulled” down between the roller and into the U-shank brackets when tensioning the belt (see images above and below).


Our roller caps are a simple and re-useable design that has worked rather well over many years. People have tried to substitute these caps with other designs without the same level of success, resulting in one-time-use and often missing roller caps (see left and below).

Setting Telebelt Feeder Lift Pressure Switches

Function:  When the main conveyors are slewed, the brakes on both the feeder and the main release.  If this happens with the feeder off the ground, the feeder will:
a) swing behind the main conveyor like a real long counterweight, or
b) take off downhill if the machine is not level.

The feeders are raised hydraulically, but they lower by gravity as the oil passes through an orifice.  The feeders must be fully lowered for the mains to slew.  It looks like you are “powering down,” but you’re just letting the cylinder and rails relax.

If there is enough pressure in the feeder elevate circuit, the (NC) pressure switches open and break the connection to the slewing valve.  The WBV valve still goes to the “boom” side.  One switch disables slew right and the other disables left, and they are both connected to the feeder lift line through a manifold block.  No oil flows to release the brakes when the slewing valve doesn’t throw.

Symptoms:  Main will not slew left, but slew right works, or vice-versa.  It’s very rare for the main to not slew in either direction because of pressure switch adjustment, but it can happen if there is enough pressure on the system.  All functions work manually.  Cable remote makes no difference.

 “Field Fix” (to complete a pour):

  1. Make sure the feeder is down fully.  All pressure must be off the feeder elevate cylinder.
  2. After confirming feeder is firmly on the ground, try manual control.  Make sure to move the WBV (selector valve) andthe slewing valve.  If it still doesn’t slew, the problem is not the pressure switch.  If the main does slew, options are:
    1. Operate slewing manually to finish the pour.  Keep the feeder firmly on the ground while slewing the main.
    2. Bypass the pressure switches by:
      1. Removing the plug connector from the top of one the switches.  On a 110, it might be necessary to remove the fan shroud to do this.  If the problem is unchanged, that is the correct plug.  If it now won’t swing either way, replace that plug and remove the other one.
      2. Put a jumper wire between pin 1 and pin 2 of the plug.  A piece of tie wire will do.  Do not reconnect the plug, but tie it out of the way to keep it from shorting.
    3. Alternate bypass – Jump X10-17 to X10-18 for right or X10-19 to X10-20 for left.
    4. This is a temporary fix and permanent repairs MUST be made before taking the unit out again. 

     

    Procedure for Setting Telebelt Feeder Lift Pressure Switches

    NOTE: THIS PROCEDURE CAN ONLY BE PERFORMED WHEN THE SWITCH IS INSTALLED IN THE CIRCUIT. THESE ILLUSTRATIONS ARE MERELY FOR SHOWING THE SWITCH.

    The feeder lift pressure switches are installed to prevent the main boom from slewing when the feeder is off the ground.  This is a safety system.  The switches are installed in the feeder elevate hydraulic circuit.

    To set the switches, you need a continuity tester, 1/8” Allen wrench and a flat-head screwdriver.

    Procedure:

      1. Support machine with outriggers.
      2. Unstow the feeder from the rest on top of the main boom and slew feeder to side of machine.
      3. Lower empty feeder (NO HOPPER OR ATTACHEMENTS) until the feeder legs are 1 to 2 feet off the ground.
      4. Turn off the remote.  The truck engine can also be shut off.
      5. Remove wire connection plugs from both switches.
      6. Remove small brass screw adapters from both switches.  These are the adapters that the plugs screw in to. 

      1. Connect a continuity tester to terminal #1 and #2 (terminals are labeled on switch and plug)

      1. With 1/8” Allen wrench, turn the pressure adjustment screw in, (screws are located under the brass screw plug you removed), until you get continuity, then back screw out until you loose continuity.  From this point, back the adjustment screw out ½ turn more, this is your final setting.

    1. Repeat steps 8 on the other switch.
    2. Reinstall the brass screw adapters and wire connection plugs.
    3. Restart the engine, reset the remote and test the settings by lowering the feeder to the ground, then lift main boom out of the boom rest and slew main boom to the right and the left.  The main boom should slew.  Then raise the feeder off the ground and slew main boom right and left.  The main boom should not move.

Tele-Teaching Telebelt Radio Remotes

There are some differences between Putzmeister boom pump remotes and Telebelt remotes.  Let’s look at them.

The early Telebelt radio functions were programmed via Tele-Teach battery, using buttons on the side of the receiver.  The newer “Ergonic” (single joystick) Telebelt remote controls are set up a little differently.

The Ergonic radio transmitters have no Tele-Teach buttons.  They are programmed with a Tele-Teach battery.  They are also different in that you Tele-Teach rabbit ONLY.  Do not Tele-teach snail, with the battery.  The minimums you set, in “rabbit,” will be the minimums used by “snail.”

NOTE:  Any Tele-Teach battery will work.  The older (yellow) Tele-Teach batteries have a lower amp/hour rating than the new (red) ones, and don’t last as long.  If you are using a yellow battery, make sure it is fully charged.  Use your standard battery for set-up, and then switch to the Tele-Teach battery for programming.

The procedure:

  • Properly set the Telebelt on outriggers.  Raise the feeder and transfer and set the feeder on the ground.  Raise the boom out of the transport rest, high enough to clear mufflers and inlets.  Allow room for boom movement in all directions.
  • Turn the radio off and insert the Tele-Teach battery.
  • Hold the “+” AND “-” buttons in while turning the radio on.  The green transmit light will be blinking twice as fast.

Each function, e.g. slew right, has to be set for minimum and maximum.  Only one function can be set at a time.  It is necessary to be able to see the Modular Boom Control (MBC) valve while programming.  So, let’s set “slew right” on the rabbit side.

  • Reset the e-stop with the horn-reset/outrigger switch.
  • Set throttle up to max
  • Set boom speed switch to “rabbit.”
  • While watching the WBV (selector) valve, move the joystick to the right
  • When the WBV moves to the boom position, stop moving the joystick farther and hold that position.
  • After a slight delay, the boom should start creeping to the right.  If it moves too quickly, use slight taps on the minus (“-“) button to slow it down.  If there is no movement, use slight taps on the plus (+) button.
  • Release the stick, then move it back to the start position to check the setting.  Very often the slight taps will take you too far.
  • When you are satisfied with the start point, slowly move the stick to full right, while watching the slewing valve.  The slewing valve must contact its mechanical stop AT THE SAME TIME you reach full right on the stick.
    • If it hits too soon, you have a narrow adjustment window in the stick, and the boom will be jerky.
    • If it doesn’t hit at all, you will not get full speed
  • While holding the stick full right, adjust valve handle travel with the plus and minus buttons.  PAY ATTENTION TO BOOM POSITION.  If you are getting close to something, like the feeder, slew left and start again.
  • After setting the maximum, recheck the minimum setting.
  • Repeat for the remaining 5 functions.
  • Turn the radio off.  The settings will be retained by the transmitter memory.
  • Remove the Tele-Teach battery and replace it with the regular battery.

NOTE:  Telebelts manufactured after early 2011 have “teachable” feeders.  Set the horn-reset/outrigger switch to outrigger and use the battery to Tele-Teach feeder slewing and elevate in “rabbit” mode, ONLY.  User-defined mode and “snail” mode have no effect on those speeds.

Now, before you stow the outriggers, let’s set slew right in the “snail” position:

  • Turn the radio on and reset the e-stop.
  • Switch the boom speed control to “snail.”
  • Move the stick to the right until the WBV valve engages.  The “creep” speed will be the same as it was in “rabbit.”  DO NOT attempt to Tele-Teach this minimum.  That will change the rabbit setting as well.  Center the stick.
  • To set the maximum speed for snail slew right
    • Move the boom speed switch up to the user-defined position and hold it there.  It’s spring-loaded.
    • Move the joystick right until the desired maximum speed is reached and hold the stick at that position.
    • Release the boom speed switch
    • Center the joystick.  Now, even if you move the joystick all the way right, the boom will only slew to the maximum you set with user-defined.
    • If you want to change the maximum, just repeat the procedure.
    • Repeat for the other functions.

Telebelt Ergonic Radio

Tele-Teach Battery

How Do I Replace My Telescope Cable?

The telescope cable on the main belt won’t last forever. Two to three years is about it, depending on your cleanliness, maintenance and location (winter chemicals can speed the aging process). Equalizer cables last much longer and do not require the tension a main cable needs to effectively do its job.

Cables are fairly easy to replace, unless they have broken. For complete instructions on the TB 105 and TB 130 telescope cable, download the Summer 2003 PDF, Tips on Replacing the Telescopic Drive Cable (PMA-0010-6 TB). Use ONLY Putzmeister authorized cables. Some types of cable (i.e., non-rotating) are unsuitable.

When replacing the main cable, inspect all sheaves. The eight-inch (203mm) sheaves mounted horizontally will wear out on their lower edge first, so check your Operator’s Manual as some can be turned over before replacement is necessary. If the effective diameter has been reduced, cables will contact end frames. Best practices indicate having two sets of eight-inch (203mm) sheaves and bearings, as well as one set of 10-inch (254mm) sheaves and bearings, available when replacing cables, just in case.

TB 105, TB 110, TB 130, TB 600

Visually inspect cables as part of your daily operational routine. First, fully extend the boom. Then, lock out the machine and walk along under the cables.

Lubricate the cables with a penetrating chain and cable lube. The cable has a wire rope core, and penetration is critical. DO NOT use any products with graphite, as it softens plastic slides on the boom.

• Assess the wraps on the telescope drive with care. Also check the cable running from the anchor point (Dead Head) of the telescope drive, out to the tip section end frame and back to the drive sheaves.

Maintain telescope cables at 2,500 psi (172 bar) with the tensioning jacks. If you are between holes at 2,500 psi (172 bar), go to the next higher hole.

Watch for signs of a loose main cable during operation. This could mean that there is too much sag in a fully extended cable, or drive sheaves spinning in the cable wraps. Spinning drives create heat, which shortens the life of the cables.

Replace the cable as soon as possible if ANY broken strands are observed. Cable failure occurs shortly after broken strands are observed.

Why Should Your Telebelt Always Wear a Skirt?

Tunnel skirts act as a funnel to direct the flow of material from the feeder belt to the main conveyor. The TB 105, TB 110 and TB 130 all have tunnel skirts, or transfer tunnels located at the feeder transfer. Tunnel skirts are invaluable in ensuring that the flow from the feeder through the transfer and onto the main belt is smooth for more efficient material placement, a cleaner job site and easier cleanup at the end of a job. Due to its design, which incorporates a transfer hopper, the TB 80 is the only Telebelt that doesn’t need a tunnel skirt.

TB110-Arm_1

TB 105 Skirts:

  • Are adjustable as needed by tying the skirts back. This is made simple by using rope or bungee cords to tie the tunnel skirt’s handles back to the transfer stand tubes.
  • Do not require hold-down springs to prevent leaks because the material used is heavy enough to provide a sufficient seal with the belts.

TB 110 and TB 130 Skirts:

  • Can be adjusted in or out, depending on the type of material being conveyed, to expose more or less of the conveyor to carry material away from the feeder transfer. Adjust in for a more narrow exposure when conveying wet concrete, and adjust out for a wide exposure when conveying dry concrete or fill material.
  • Feature easy adjustment by moving the tunnels in or out on two sets of mounting brackets. This can be done in about 10 minutes without the need for any tools.
  • Use hold-down springs to make a seal with the belts that prevents any leakage of material being conveyed.

What Do Boom Covers Actually Do?

Boom covers are a factory-installed standard feature on the main conveyor belt of all Telebelt models and must be used at all times. They prevent material from leaking down onto the return side of the belt or into the structural parts of the boom. Boom covers are located on the base section of the Telebelt, or arm one.

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Why Are Boom Covers So Important?

  • Failure to use your boom cover can result in rock bounce if the belt is set to run too fast, causing rocks to fall through and ride the return side of the belt. This will ultimately punch holes in the belt and dramatically shorten its lifespan.
  • Boom covers prevent large rocks from getting stuck in the roller cradles, ensuring that when the boom retracts, trapped rocks do not bend the roller cradles.

TECH NOTE – BOOM COVERS

To determine if you need to replace your boom cover, stand under the base section and look up. If you see daylight between the boom cover and the main conveyor, it’s time to replace the boom cover. Please contact Putzmeister Customer Support at 1-800-890-0269.