Apr052012

Tele-Teaching Telebelt Radio Remotes

There are some differences between Putzmeister boom pump remotes and Telebelt remotes.  Let’s look at them.

The early Telebelt radio functions were programmed via Tele-Teach battery, using buttons on the side of the receiver.  The newer “Ergonic” (single joystick) Telebelt remote controls are set up a little differently.

The Ergonic radio transmitters have no Tele-Teach buttons.  They are programmed with a Tele-Teach battery.  They are also different in that you Tele-Teach rabbit ONLY.  Do not Tele-teach snail, with the battery.  The minimums you set, in “rabbit,” will be the minimums used by “snail.”

NOTE:  Any Tele-Teach battery will work.  The older (yellow) Tele-Teach batteries have a lower amp/hour rating than the new (red) ones, and don’t last as long.  If you are using a yellow battery, make sure it is fully charged.  Use your standard battery for set-up, and then switch to the Tele-Teach battery for programming.

The procedure:

  • Properly set the Telebelt on outriggers.  Raise the feeder and transfer and set the feeder on the ground.  Raise the boom out of the transport rest, high enough to clear mufflers and inlets.  Allow room for boom movement in all directions.
  • Turn the radio off and insert the Tele-Teach battery.
  • Hold the “+” AND “-” buttons in while turning the radio on.  The green transmit light will be blinking twice as fast.

Each function, e.g. slew right, has to be set for minimum and maximum.  Only one function can be set at a time.  It is necessary to be able to see the Modular Boom Control (MBC) valve while programming.  So, let’s set “slew right” on the rabbit side.

  • Reset the e-stop with the horn-reset/outrigger switch.
  • Set throttle up to max
  • Set boom speed switch to “rabbit.”
  • While watching the WBV (selector) valve, move the joystick to the right
  • When the WBV moves to the boom position, stop moving the joystick farther and hold that position.
  • After a slight delay, the boom should start creeping to the right.  If it moves too quickly, use slight taps on the minus (“-“) button to slow it down.  If there is no movement, use slight taps on the plus (+) button.
  • Release the stick, then move it back to the start position to check the setting.  Very often the slight taps will take you too far.
  • When you are satisfied with the start point, slowly move the stick to full right, while watching the slewing valve.  The slewing valve must contact its mechanical stop AT THE SAME TIME you reach full right on the stick.
    • If it hits too soon, you have a narrow adjustment window in the stick, and the boom will be jerky.
    • If it doesn’t hit at all, you will not get full speed
  • While holding the stick full right, adjust valve handle travel with the plus and minus buttons.  PAY ATTENTION TO BOOM POSITION.  If you are getting close to something, like the feeder, slew left and start again.
  • After setting the maximum, recheck the minimum setting.
  • Repeat for the remaining 5 functions.
  • Turn the radio off.  The settings will be retained by the transmitter memory.
  • Remove the Tele-Teach battery and replace it with the regular battery.

NOTE:  Telebelts manufactured after early 2011 have “teachable” feeders.  Set the horn-reset/outrigger switch to outrigger and use the battery to Tele-Teach feeder slewing and elevate in “rabbit” mode, ONLY.  User-defined mode and “snail” mode have no effect on those speeds.

Now, before you stow the outriggers, let’s set slew right in the “snail” position:

  • Turn the radio on and reset the e-stop.
  • Switch the boom speed control to “snail.”
  • Move the stick to the right until the WBV valve engages.  The “creep” speed will be the same as it was in “rabbit.”  DO NOT attempt to Tele-Teach this minimum.  That will change the rabbit setting as well.  Center the stick.
  • To set the maximum speed for snail slew right
    • Move the boom speed switch up to the user-defined position and hold it there.  It’s spring-loaded.
    • Move the joystick right until the desired maximum speed is reached and hold the stick at that position.
    • Release the boom speed switch
    • Center the joystick.  Now, even if you move the joystick all the way right, the boom will only slew to the maximum you set with user-defined.
    • If you want to change the maximum, just repeat the procedure.
    • Repeat for the other functions.

Telebelt Ergonic Radio

Tele-Teach Battery

Apr142010

BOOM PUMP: Proximity Switches

Your Putzmeister boom pump uses proximity switches (aka prox switch) to cycle the pump. Some quick tips to keep them from being a misunderstood part on your pump.

 

What might go wrong?

Prox switches are screwed directly in to the drive cylinders and are subject to high pressure hydraulic oil. It is common to over tighten them, they take 14 foot pounds of torque which is a relatively low torque. Because they are in the pump hydraulic cylinder subject to high pressure oil they are quite often over torqued, this distorts the switch and it will fail early or not work correctly. The prox switches have a high pressure seal to handle the pressure subjected to them.

Next prox switches are grounded through the cable not the cylinder, so to test the system you can take a new switch, plug it in, touch it to metal and it will trigger. The switch works from magnetic principle, the piston is steel and the switch is triggered by this steel piston passing under it.

PMA Prox Switch Testing

PMA Prox Switch Testing

Deciphering the Light and Wires

On top of the plug you will see two LEDs one is green and one is yellow, The green one indicates that power is getting to the switch, the yellow one is the trigger signal that indicates the piston is under the switch sending a signal to the relay.

The prox switch wires go back to the distribution box, this box combines the signal to send it to the stroke change relay, LEDs are located at this box to tell you if they are working, you might have four or six switches on the standard units.

We encourage you to watch the lights when you are cycling the unit to clean the water box. You should see the yellow LEDs flash when the piston is passing under the switch; you have two switches at each position. They are working together as a backup which means if one fails you are still pumping.

PMA Prox Switch LED Lights

PMA Prox Switch LED Lights

Ways Prox Switches Fail

Switches can generally fail two ways, the yellow LED does not turn on when the piston passes under it, this is the most common failure. They can also fail by being stuck on. The yellow LED will be on even though the piston is not under the switch. In the first case no action is necessary, but if the switch is stuck on it will need to be disconnected from the system as it will interfere with the cycling of the relay. Simply unplug the one that is failed on, and resume pumping.

We all know that if it can go wrong it most likely will, this is the reason for the redundant-style system. However, quite often due to lack of maintenance or lack of understanding one switch will fail, then at some point the other switch will fail and now you have a problem. So familiarize yourself with the system and check it frequently so you can avoid being down due to prox switch failure.

PMAProxSwitch2

The pictures show a model used in the Putzmeister Service School class room to demonstrate the switches and the cylinder position, as well as, testing a switch not installed on a unit.

Mar252010

BOOM PUMP: Having E-Stop Issues? Simple Things to Check.

This relates to standard 12V units as well as early European 24V units.

Every component in your Control (aka Combi) Box should be labeled; age and changing parts without putting a sticker on the new part can lead to problems. In the image the decal shows 10A17, yours might say 6A17.

E-stop

Deciphering the Number

The first number, 10 or 6, is the page number of the schematic that you will find this component on. All components in the Combi box work this way; for example, 6F76 is the fuse for e-stop on page 6. The page number of the schematic varies with the options a unit has, or the amount of revisions to a particular unit. We can go into revisions later.

The letter, A, is the code for the part, A= Assembly, F=Fuse, S=switch, K=relay. Notice a German unit’s code letters are the same as English.

The second number, 17, is the assigned number for the device. Notice 10A17 and 6A17 are the same part just different pages in the schematic.

So You Are Having Issues With The E-Stop? A Quick Test Will Reveal Why.

Look at top left and find Terminal A1 (+), also in the lower right find A2 (-), putting a voltage tester at these 2 points will tell you if you have voltage. We NEED to use a voltage tester not a test light to see how much voltage we have here. Note: The red locking paint might need to be cleaned a little at the screw to get a good test.

For this relay to reset and hold you need to maintain 12 VDC, these 2 pins are powering a coil that is rated for 12 VDC. If you hit an E-stop button on the unit or turn off the remote, the voltage disappears and the relay unlocks, the 2 green lights go out and nothing works. So if you have no voltage here check the E-Stop buttons on your remote and if the local/remote switch is in the center position. A quick test for checking the remote is to set the local/remote switch to local and check for voltage. If the E-Stop resets and you have 12(+- 2 VDC), you have a remote issue, try your hard wire remote.

As previously, mentioned, always test with a voltage tester not a light, also test using the A2 (-) pin for ground, this is the ground the relay is using, If the wire from A2 to ground is bad the relay won’t set either. A quick check for this is: positive lead on A1, negative lead on A2 and look at the result, then move the negative lead to main ground in the Combi Box and look at the result. No or low voltage at A1 and A2, and 13.6 at A1 and the main ground point tells you that your problem is a bad ground from A2 to the main ground, follow that part of the circuit.

Voltage Drop

Most of the time the issue is voltage drop. I get a comment like “I get the E-stop to clear and start pumping then I hit 2 or 3 boom functions and it goes back into E-stop. If I do one function at a time it stays on.”  To avoid this or find the issue you need to test for voltage drop at A1. You can do this with the boom closed just don’t put the transmission in gear; have someone assist you with the remote, make sure the engine is running, PTO ON, not in gear on the transmission, this way you can activate the electrical components and not bend boom arms. That’s a different Tricks of the Trade post.

Check for the voltage at A1 then clear the E-stop by honking the horn, turn on the pump and see the voltage drop a little, next hit A arm, it dropped a little more didn’t it,“ then B, then slewing, then tip. Each function you activate is more draw on the circuit and at some point the E-stop relay will drop out. Not from a bad E-stop button but from voltage drop.

The problem is current flow. Look for loose or corroded wires in the E-stop switches or in the cable powering the remote receiver. Open the boxes and look at the wires, are they loose? Give them a little yank did it pull out of the terminal or sleeve? One common source for resistance issues is corrosion in the cable due to washing the pump with acid. Acid loves concrete, copper and chrome, it is not recommended to use acid to wash pumps. I have seen it turn the wires green as far as 3 feet inside the plastic coating, a major source for voltage drop. Poor grounds for the Combi Box and poor power from the truck are also big issues as the unit ages.

Take the time to do this easy test, if your voltage drops you can dig a little deeper to locate the problem and avoid future issues by resolving the problem now.

Do  Not Bypass E-Stop.

This is also the time to mention that bypassing the E-Stop is a serious problem, if the power is not at the A1 pin then even if bypassed the remote won’t work. This is due to the fact that the remote is being powered with this same circuit. So bypassing is not the best way out of problems it presents major safety issues and most likely won’t get you up and running on the remote.

As mentioned in the beginning, this is the basic start to troubleshooting the 12V Combi Box. If you have a 24 V ZMSK box the E-stop circuit is a little different, contact the Service Dept (800-890-0269), e-mail me (woodsa@putzam.com) or comment on this post and we can go deeper into the particulars.

Dec072009

Happy Holidays from Putzmeister

Oct222009

Telebelt Belt Card Adjustments

Putzmeister Telebelts give the operator the means to adjust the speeds of the main and feeder conveyors.  When adjustments are made to the belt speed knobs (potentiometers), a variable signal (4 to 10 mA) is sent to the 14A20 amplifiers. Depending on the input signal, these amplifiers supply 0 to 10 volts to the belt on/off relays, then to the 14A24 proportional amplifiers, known as belt cards.

The belt cards supply voltage to the motor control valves 14B36.  Feedback sensors on the motor control valves report valve position back to the belt cards.

Note: Older Telebelts have the belt circuits on schematic page 10. The components are 10Axx, instead of 14Axx.

All of the components in the belt card circuits operate on 24 volts.  The 12/24 converter is on the inside of the cabinet door.  The belt cards are protected by 24v fuses. All 24v conductors are purple.

There are two completely separate circuits (refer to A370160K, pages 6 and 14 shown here):

A370160KUNIFIEDCRTLBOX 06

A370160KUNIFIEDCRTLBOX14

Main belt:  A43.1,  14A20.1, 6K360, 14A24.1, 14B36.1

Feeder belt: A43.2, 14A20.2, 6K361, 14A24.2, 14B36.2

Older TB-105’s using schematic A383009 have the same components on pages 6 and 10. The component numbers are 10A20.1,2, 10A24.1,2 and 10B36.1,2

The belt cards have indicator LED’s and adjustment screws as shown.

TelebeltBeltCard

Telebeltbox

TelebeltBoxCloseUp

Belt card adjustment may be required for component wear or replacement.  If the belt cards were swapped for troubleshooting, and not put back where they came from, adjustments could be off.

ADJUSTING CARD SETTINGS

The following outlines the adjustment of the four adjustable values of the belt cards.  All values INCREASE by turning CLOCKWISE.

Ramp Adjustments

“Ramp Up” controls the time it takes the belt to accelerate to its set speed, and “Ramp Down” controls the time it takes the belt to decelerate to a stop. Adjustment is from 0 –5 seconds.  Care must be taken if adjustment is made, since it is possible to have the feeder in a ramp cycle while the main is not running.

Factory setting:

1. Decrease all ramp screws (counterclockwise) to zero

2. Set ramp down on both cards to two full turns open (clockwise)

3. Set main ramp up to four full turns open (clockwise)

4.Set feeder ramp up to six full turns open (clockwise)

To be sure which way to turn the screws, remove a card and look at the adjustable resistor connected to the screws.  Turn the screws counterclockwise so the sliding “slugs” in the resistors move to the end away from the black face plate of the card. There are no stops, so there is no way to turn too far.  This is the zero point in step 1.

Max

The gain “MAX” screw adjusts the gain of the belt speed knobs.  To check these adjustments, time the belts while running them at full speed with the manual by-pass.  Next, run the belts with the remote to see if the same speed is reached.  If the belt is slower, increasing the gain will speed the belt up.

STOP increasing the setting when the belt doesn’t go any faster.  You can determine this by timing the belt, or just go by the sound of the belt.  Turning the gain screw up too far narrows the adjustment “window” on the belt speed knobs.  Therefore, if you have a belt that doesn’t run until “3” or “4,” and full speed is reached at “6” or “7,” set the knob at “10” and decrease the gain setting until the belt starts to slow down.  This will open the “window” back up.

Zero

The zero screw calibrates the position of the feedback sensor.  Whenever the e-stop circuit is reset, the LED’s on the belt motor controllers will be on.  The ZERO setting positions the valves so that the belts are not running.

If the ZERO is too high, the belts can “creep” or run slowly when the belt switches are off.  Pushing an e-stop will stop the belts.  With the e-stop reset, adjust by turning the ZERO screw counterclockwise toward “-“, 1/8 turn at a time, until the belt stops.

If the ZERO is too low, a speed setting of “2” or “3” might be required to get the belt to move.  Increase the ZERO setting until the belt just starts, then back off until it stops again.  Subsequent adjustments might be necessary, due to change in resistance from the rollers, scrapers or skirts.

TelebeltRemoteControl

Aug252009

Telebelt Low Clearance Applications

Aug202009

How Do I Replace My Telescope Cable?

The telescope cable on the main belt won’t last forever. Two to three years is about it, depending on your cleanliness, maintenance and location (winter chemicals can speed the aging process). Equalizer cables last much longer and do not require the tension a main cable needs to effectively do its job.

Cables are fairly easy to replace, unless they have broken. For complete instructions on the TB 105 and TB 130 telescope cable, download the Summer 2003 PDF, Tips on Replacing the Telescopic Drive Cable (PMA-0010-6 TB). Use ONLY Putzmeister authorized cables. Some types of cable (i.e., non-rotating) are unsuitable.

When replacing the main cable, inspect all sheaves. The eight-inch (203mm) sheaves mounted horizontally will wear out on their lower edge first, so check your Operator’s Manual as some can be turned over before replacement is necessary. If the effective diameter has been reduced, cables will contact end frames. Best practices indicate having two sets of eight-inch (203mm) sheaves and bearings, as well as one set of 10-inch (254mm) sheaves and bearings, available when replacing cables, just in case.

TB 105, TB 110, TB 130, TB 600

Visually inspect cables as part of your daily operational routine. First, fully extend the boom. Then, lock out the machine and walk along under the cables.

Lubricate the cables with a penetrating chain and cable lube. The cable has a wire rope core, and penetration is critical. DO NOT use any products with graphite, as it softens plastic slides on the boom.

• Assess the wraps on the telescope drive with care. Also check the cable running from the anchor point (Dead Head) of the telescope drive, out to the tip section end frame and back to the drive sheaves.

Maintain telescope cables at 2,500 psi (172 bar) with the tensioning jacks. If you are between holes at 2,500 psi (172 bar), go to the next higher hole.

Watch for signs of a loose main cable during operation. This could mean that there is too much sag in a fully extended cable, or drive sheaves spinning in the cable wraps. Spinning drives create heat, which shortens the life of the cables.

Replace the cable as soon as possible if ANY broken strands are observed. Cable failure occurs shortly after broken strands are observed.

Jul062009

Why Should Your Telebelt Always Wear a Skirt?

Tunnel skirts act as a funnel to direct the flow of material from the feeder belt to the main conveyor. The TB 105, TB 110 and TB 130 all have tunnel skirts, or transfer tunnels located at the feeder transfer. Tunnel skirts are invaluable in ensuring that the flow from the feeder through the transfer and onto the main belt is smooth for more efficient material placement, a cleaner job site and easier cleanup at the end of a job. Due to its design, which incorporates a transfer hopper, the TB 80 is the only Telebelt that doesn’t need a tunnel skirt.

TB110-Arm_1

TB 105 Skirts:

  • Are adjustable as needed by tying the skirts back. This is made simple by using rope or bungee cords to tie the tunnel skirt’s handles back to the transfer stand tubes.
  • Do not require hold-down springs to prevent leaks because the material used is heavy enough to provide a sufficient seal with the belts.

TB 110 and TB 130 Skirts:

  • Can be adjusted in or out, depending on the type of material being conveyed, to expose more or less of the conveyor to carry material away from the feeder transfer. Adjust in for a more narrow exposure when conveying wet concrete, and adjust out for a wide exposure when conveying dry concrete or fill material.
  • Feature easy adjustment by moving the tunnels in or out on two sets of mounting brackets. This can be done in about 10 minutes without the need for any tools.
  • Use hold-down springs to make a seal with the belts that prevents any leakage of material being conveyed.

What Do Boom Covers Actually Do?

Boom covers are a factory-installed standard feature on the main conveyor belt of all Telebelt models and must be used at all times. They prevent material from leaking down onto the return side of the belt or into the structural parts of the boom. Boom covers are located on the base section of the Telebelt, or arm one.

0062012X

Why Are Boom Covers So Important?

  • Failure to use your boom cover can result in rock bounce if the belt is set to run too fast, causing rocks to fall through and ride the return side of the belt. This will ultimately punch holes in the belt and dramatically shorten its lifespan.
  • Boom covers prevent large rocks from getting stuck in the roller cradles, ensuring that when the boom retracts, trapped rocks do not bend the roller cradles.

TECH NOTE – BOOM COVERS

To determine if you need to replace your boom cover, stand under the base section and look up. If you see daylight between the boom cover and the main conveyor, it’s time to replace the boom cover. Please contact Putzmeister Customer Support at 1-800-890-0269.