Putzmeister Boom Valve Coil Tips

I have a little more homework and Info for you guys.

Over the years we all have had issues with setting and adjusting the boom speeds, either to fast or to slow, the function can feel rough or jerky or even black and white. Some have tried to repeatedly adjust the boom speeds with the Teleteach buttons or battery to no good result. If you need to constantly teach the remote you generally have a remote issue, other than oil temp variance the settings should stay relatively the same, week to week.

But there is another option you can easily look at for these types of symptoms.

The joystick is communicating to the coil on the boom valve, the coils can wear out, as they draw more Amps the range of motion changes, thus the need to adjust from time to time.

The plunger spool’s that the coil’s drive can also get sticky or gummed up over time. The images below will show you how to remove and clean the spools, test the coils, and look for issues. The coils are the same from valve to valve, so they can be moved around. BUT BEWARE, on units equipped with EBC this is not advisable, the computer is set to work with the coil and valve matched, adjustments to the EBC programming might need to be reset if coils are changed or moved around.

The leading problem we have with Mother Boards on 24 V systems is over Amping the fuse. If an outrigger or Boom coil is bad it can draw high amps and blow the fuse.  DO NOT PUT IN A BIGGER FUSE, RUN THE FUNCTION MANUALY AND FIX THE ISSUE.

 Other issues that can give you problems with these spools and other components on the unit are cheap oil, dirty oil, water in the oil, and high “TAN” numbers. These all lead to corrosion and sticky components all over the unit. Phantom issues that come and go are usually related to the oil and its condition. Do oil sample testing to ensure the condition of your oil. Oil that has water in it looks milky ONLY after it has become saturated with to much water, clear oil in the sight gauge can still have to much water in it. The only way to know for sure is to have it tested.

 

I hope this helps and brings out even more questions, please feel free to ask online or call PM CSG at 1-800-890-0269, or myself at 360-600-5695, or reach me by email at woodsa@putzam.com.

 

As always, be safe and keep the rubber side down.

Travelteck

 


PICTURE 1:
Coils are located behind the Boom valves. All the coils on a unit are the same, they can be swapped if needed.

Example: the Coil for the Boom / Outrigger is having issues, the Coil from the B arm could be used to swap with the Boom / Outrigger to get through a job.

Units with EBC rely on adjustments to compensate for coil resistance. On unit’s equipped with EBC you can change coils but EBC might need to be readjusted for the new coil. Without EBC there would not be an issue, but swapping coils to diagnose is not recommended on functioning EBC units.

High resistance values or shorted coils are one of the leading killers of Motherboards, NEVER over amp a fuse to make a function work even if it is for a “short time”, the motherboard will become the next fuse. Remember, everything you turn on with an electrical switch can be run MANUALY.

Test Lights and Bad Grounds

Test Lights and Bad Grounds

Test Light – A probe-type device that lights up, under certain circumstances.  Sold in automotive and other novelty stores, it is used to troubleshoot simple electrical circuits, and other witchcraft.

Test lights are great for troubleshooting tail light circuits on your boat trailer.  They have NO business inside a combi-box.  Telebelt combi-boxes have circuits carrying 24v, 12v, 5v, variable voltage and signal circuits that are read in milliamps.  You can complete circuits, and cause components to fry.  In other words, you can “let the smoke out.”

Basic Rule of Electricity #1 – Smoke makes all electrical things work.  Smoke makes computer chips work. Every time you let the smoke out of a computer chip, it stops working.  Electric motors have to be large to handle all that smoke. A lot of smoke leaks out when they quit working.

Use a multi-meter.  Get one that measures DC voltage, amperage and resistance.  You don’t have to spend hundreds of dollars for a top-of-the-line Fluke meter.  You can get one for less than $10, and it will do what you need.  Keep it in your combi-box.  It will live longer there.

Sooner or later, you might end up calling in with an electrical problem.  You should have a copy of your schematic and a meter.  You are our “eyes and hands” when we troubleshoot over the phone.  We’re not much help if you can’t furnish voltage readings for us.

Bad Grounds

Some of the most difficult calls we get are traced to bad grounds.

I recently had a call from an owner that could not get his TB-105 e-stop to reset.  After going through the steps to figure it out, I determined his e-stop relay was toast.  This was an older TB-105 with a negative Mack battery disconnect.  These were notorious for high resistance at the wire contacts of the Mack switch.  Electrical components that are not properly grounded, can fail.  E-stop relays were particularly sensitive.

I wanted him to check his ground, but he didn’t have a meter.  He did have a test light that lit when he touched the positive and negative terminals of the e-stop relay.  That really doesn’t tell me all I need to know. 

He went and got a $5 meter.  When he connected the meter to the positive and negative e-stop terminals, he read 13.8 volts, since the truck was running.  Then I had him connect the negative lead of the meter to a frame ground and touch the positive lead to the ground side of the e-stop relay.  He read 2.3 volts.  I had him touch the positive lead to the M12 screws (combi-box ground) and he still read 2.3 volts.  In both cases, he should have read zero.

The problem will be traced to the connections on the Mack disconnect switch.  NOTE:  When loosening or tightening nuts on the back side of the switch, use 2 wrenches.  There is a wrench flat at the base of the studs.  Use one wrench on those flats to keep the studs from turning and twisting the wires off internally.

Another way to check the ground is by resistance.  Set your meter to OHMS.  Checking between M12 and a frame ground should read nearly zero ohms.  There is resistance in the wire.  Some meters have a continuity tester in the ohms scale.  They should “beep” when checking this way.

Oh, and meters can check diodes, too.  This way we can help you find the smoked diode in the 25 AMP fan circuit that somebody put a 40 AMP fuse in.