How to Use Backup Controls

Understanding the functions on the manual backup valve bank.

Valve Bank: Most common with Gen 3 or Monochrome Screen, can also be Gen 4.

1

Stroke manually:

Short Oval Knob Handle: strokes drive cylinders. Push or pull handle and hold for the duration of one stroke. Truck must be above 1200 rpm.

Tall Ball Knob Handle: shifts S-valve. Push or Pull and release. Holding in position is not required.

2

Blue: Accumulator dump valve, manual operation button.

Red: S-valve cycle valve, electric coils driven by CCU, manual palm buttons on each end of valve.

Green: Accumulator pressure relief “Backup” 250 bar (3,625 psi)

 

 

Manual Valve Bank: Gen 4 Model3

Green: Drive cylinder stroke valve. Push or pull and hold in position for the full duration of one stroke.

Red: Accumulator dump valve manual override.

Blue: S-Valve cycle valve.

Hard/Soft Shift for S-Valve

4

Hard-Shift: In-line (shown)

Soft-Shift: Closed at 90°

Accumulator Bottle:

5Accumulator Bottle: 4 Liters

Pressures:

6

WP Water Pump Pressure: 190 bar (2,755 psi)

RW Auger Pressure: 160 bar (2,320 psi)

Manual Auger and Water Pump Valve Block: Applies to Both Generation 3 and 4

7

Green: Manual valve for water pump

Blue: Manual auger forward valve

Red: Manual auger reverse valve

8

Green: Manual valve for water pump

Blue: Manual auger forward valve

Red: Manual auger reverse valve

To operate auger reverse, both the Red and Blue coils or valves must be engaged.

Setting Telebelt Feeder Lift Pressure Switches

Function:  When the main conveyors are slewed, the brakes on both the feeder and the main release.  If this happens with the feeder off the ground, the feeder will:
a) swing behind the main conveyor like a real long counterweight, or
b) take off downhill if the machine is not level.

The feeders are raised hydraulically, but they lower by gravity as the oil passes through an orifice.  The feeders must be fully lowered for the mains to slew.  It looks like you are “powering down,” but you’re just letting the cylinder and rails relax.

If there is enough pressure in the feeder elevate circuit, the (NC) pressure switches open and break the connection to the slewing valve.  The WBV valve still goes to the “boom” side.  One switch disables slew right and the other disables left, and they are both connected to the feeder lift line through a manifold block.  No oil flows to release the brakes when the slewing valve doesn’t throw.

Symptoms:  Main will not slew left, but slew right works, or vice-versa.  It’s very rare for the main to not slew in either direction because of pressure switch adjustment, but it can happen if there is enough pressure on the system.  All functions work manually.  Cable remote makes no difference.

 “Field Fix” (to complete a pour):

  1. Make sure the feeder is down fully.  All pressure must be off the feeder elevate cylinder.
  2. After confirming feeder is firmly on the ground, try manual control.  Make sure to move the WBV (selector valve) andthe slewing valve.  If it still doesn’t slew, the problem is not the pressure switch.  If the main does slew, options are:
    1. Operate slewing manually to finish the pour.  Keep the feeder firmly on the ground while slewing the main.
    2. Bypass the pressure switches by:
      1. Removing the plug connector from the top of one the switches.  On a 110, it might be necessary to remove the fan shroud to do this.  If the problem is unchanged, that is the correct plug.  If it now won’t swing either way, replace that plug and remove the other one.
      2. Put a jumper wire between pin 1 and pin 2 of the plug.  A piece of tie wire will do.  Do not reconnect the plug, but tie it out of the way to keep it from shorting.
    3. Alternate bypass – Jump X10-17 to X10-18 for right or X10-19 to X10-20 for left.
    4. This is a temporary fix and permanent repairs MUST be made before taking the unit out again. 

     

    Procedure for Setting Telebelt Feeder Lift Pressure Switches

    NOTE: THIS PROCEDURE CAN ONLY BE PERFORMED WHEN THE SWITCH IS INSTALLED IN THE CIRCUIT. THESE ILLUSTRATIONS ARE MERELY FOR SHOWING THE SWITCH.

    The feeder lift pressure switches are installed to prevent the main boom from slewing when the feeder is off the ground.  This is a safety system.  The switches are installed in the feeder elevate hydraulic circuit.

    To set the switches, you need a continuity tester, 1/8” Allen wrench and a flat-head screwdriver.

    Procedure:

      1. Support machine with outriggers.
      2. Unstow the feeder from the rest on top of the main boom and slew feeder to side of machine.
      3. Lower empty feeder (NO HOPPER OR ATTACHEMENTS) until the feeder legs are 1 to 2 feet off the ground.
      4. Turn off the remote.  The truck engine can also be shut off.
      5. Remove wire connection plugs from both switches.
      6. Remove small brass screw adapters from both switches.  These are the adapters that the plugs screw in to. 

      1. Connect a continuity tester to terminal #1 and #2 (terminals are labeled on switch and plug)

      1. With 1/8” Allen wrench, turn the pressure adjustment screw in, (screws are located under the brass screw plug you removed), until you get continuity, then back screw out until you loose continuity.  From this point, back the adjustment screw out ½ turn more, this is your final setting.

    1. Repeat steps 8 on the other switch.
    2. Reinstall the brass screw adapters and wire connection plugs.
    3. Restart the engine, reset the remote and test the settings by lowering the feeder to the ground, then lift main boom out of the boom rest and slew main boom to the right and the left.  The main boom should slew.  Then raise the feeder off the ground and slew main boom right and left.  The main boom should not move.

BOOM PUMP: Having E-Stop Issues? Simple Things to Check.

This relates to standard 12V units as well as early European 24V units.

Every component in your Control (aka Combi) Box should be labeled; age and changing parts without putting a sticker on the new part can lead to problems. In the image the decal shows 10A17, yours might say 6A17.

E-stop

Deciphering the Number

The first number, 10 or 6, is the page number of the schematic that you will find this component on. All components in the Combi box work this way; for example, 6F76 is the fuse for e-stop on page 6. The page number of the schematic varies with the options a unit has, or the amount of revisions to a particular unit. We can go into revisions later.

The letter, A, is the code for the part, A= Assembly, F=Fuse, S=switch, K=relay. Notice a German unit’s code letters are the same as English.

The second number, 17, is the assigned number for the device. Notice 10A17 and 6A17 are the same part just different pages in the schematic.

So You Are Having Issues With The E-Stop? A Quick Test Will Reveal Why.

Look at top left and find Terminal A1 (+), also in the lower right find A2 (-), putting a voltage tester at these 2 points will tell you if you have voltage. We NEED to use a voltage tester not a test light to see how much voltage we have here. Note: The red locking paint might need to be cleaned a little at the screw to get a good test.

For this relay to reset and hold you need to maintain 12 VDC, these 2 pins are powering a coil that is rated for 12 VDC. If you hit an E-stop button on the unit or turn off the remote, the voltage disappears and the relay unlocks, the 2 green lights go out and nothing works. So if you have no voltage here check the E-Stop buttons on your remote and if the local/remote switch is in the center position. A quick test for checking the remote is to set the local/remote switch to local and check for voltage. If the E-Stop resets and you have 12(+- 2 VDC), you have a remote issue, try your hard wire remote.

As previously, mentioned, always test with a voltage tester not a light, also test using the A2 (-) pin for ground, this is the ground the relay is using, If the wire from A2 to ground is bad the relay won’t set either. A quick check for this is: positive lead on A1, negative lead on A2 and look at the result, then move the negative lead to main ground in the Combi Box and look at the result. No or low voltage at A1 and A2, and 13.6 at A1 and the main ground point tells you that your problem is a bad ground from A2 to the main ground, follow that part of the circuit.

Voltage Drop

Most of the time the issue is voltage drop. I get a comment like “I get the E-stop to clear and start pumping then I hit 2 or 3 boom functions and it goes back into E-stop. If I do one function at a time it stays on.”  To avoid this or find the issue you need to test for voltage drop at A1. You can do this with the boom closed just don’t put the transmission in gear; have someone assist you with the remote, make sure the engine is running, PTO ON, not in gear on the transmission, this way you can activate the electrical components and not bend boom arms. That’s a different Tricks of the Trade post.

Check for the voltage at A1 then clear the E-stop by honking the horn, turn on the pump and see the voltage drop a little, next hit A arm, it dropped a little more didn’t it,“ then B, then slewing, then tip. Each function you activate is more draw on the circuit and at some point the E-stop relay will drop out. Not from a bad E-stop button but from voltage drop.

The problem is current flow. Look for loose or corroded wires in the E-stop switches or in the cable powering the remote receiver. Open the boxes and look at the wires, are they loose? Give them a little yank did it pull out of the terminal or sleeve? One common source for resistance issues is corrosion in the cable due to washing the pump with acid. Acid loves concrete, copper and chrome, it is not recommended to use acid to wash pumps. I have seen it turn the wires green as far as 3 feet inside the plastic coating, a major source for voltage drop. Poor grounds for the Combi Box and poor power from the truck are also big issues as the unit ages.

Take the time to do this easy test, if your voltage drops you can dig a little deeper to locate the problem and avoid future issues by resolving the problem now.

Do  Not Bypass E-Stop.

This is also the time to mention that bypassing the E-Stop is a serious problem, if the power is not at the A1 pin then even if bypassed the remote won’t work. This is due to the fact that the remote is being powered with this same circuit. So bypassing is not the best way out of problems it presents major safety issues and most likely won’t get you up and running on the remote.

As mentioned in the beginning, this is the basic start to troubleshooting the 12V Combi Box. If you have a 24 V ZMSK box the E-stop circuit is a little different, contact the Service Dept (800-890-0269), e-mail me (woodsa@putzam.com) or comment on this post and we can go deeper into the particulars.

Happy Holidays from Putzmeister

How Do I Replace My Telescope Cable?

The telescope cable on the main belt won’t last forever. Two to three years is about it, depending on your cleanliness, maintenance and location (winter chemicals can speed the aging process). Equalizer cables last much longer and do not require the tension a main cable needs to effectively do its job.

Cables are fairly easy to replace, unless they have broken. For complete instructions on the TB 105 and TB 130 telescope cable, download the Summer 2003 PDF, Tips on Replacing the Telescopic Drive Cable (PMA-0010-6 TB). Use ONLY Putzmeister authorized cables. Some types of cable (i.e., non-rotating) are unsuitable.

When replacing the main cable, inspect all sheaves. The eight-inch (203mm) sheaves mounted horizontally will wear out on their lower edge first, so check your Operator’s Manual as some can be turned over before replacement is necessary. If the effective diameter has been reduced, cables will contact end frames. Best practices indicate having two sets of eight-inch (203mm) sheaves and bearings, as well as one set of 10-inch (254mm) sheaves and bearings, available when replacing cables, just in case.

TB 105, TB 110, TB 130, TB 600

Visually inspect cables as part of your daily operational routine. First, fully extend the boom. Then, lock out the machine and walk along under the cables.

Lubricate the cables with a penetrating chain and cable lube. The cable has a wire rope core, and penetration is critical. DO NOT use any products with graphite, as it softens plastic slides on the boom.

• Assess the wraps on the telescope drive with care. Also check the cable running from the anchor point (Dead Head) of the telescope drive, out to the tip section end frame and back to the drive sheaves.

Maintain telescope cables at 2,500 psi (172 bar) with the tensioning jacks. If you are between holes at 2,500 psi (172 bar), go to the next higher hole.

Watch for signs of a loose main cable during operation. This could mean that there is too much sag in a fully extended cable, or drive sheaves spinning in the cable wraps. Spinning drives create heat, which shortens the life of the cables.

Replace the cable as soon as possible if ANY broken strands are observed. Cable failure occurs shortly after broken strands are observed.