Telebelt Belt Card Adjustments

Putzmeister Telebelts give the operator the means to adjust the speeds of the main and feeder conveyors.  When adjustments are made to the belt speed knobs (potentiometers), a variable signal (4 to 10 mA) is sent to the 14A20 amplifiers. Depending on the input signal, these amplifiers supply 0 to 10 volts to the belt on/off relays, then to the 14A24 proportional amplifiers, known as belt cards.

The belt cards supply voltage to the motor control valves 14B36.  Feedback sensors on the motor control valves report valve position back to the belt cards.

Note: Older Telebelts have the belt circuits on schematic page 10. The components are 10Axx, instead of 14Axx.

All of the components in the belt card circuits operate on 24 volts.  The 12/24 converter is on the inside of the cabinet door.  The belt cards are protected by 24v fuses. All 24v conductors are purple.

There are two completely separate circuits (refer to A370160K, pages 6 and 14 shown here):

A370160KUNIFIEDCRTLBOX 06

A370160KUNIFIEDCRTLBOX14

Main belt:  A43.1,  14A20.1, 6K360, 14A24.1, 14B36.1

Feeder belt: A43.2, 14A20.2, 6K361, 14A24.2, 14B36.2

Older TB-105’s using schematic A383009 have the same components on pages 6 and 10. The component numbers are 10A20.1,2, 10A24.1,2 and 10B36.1,2

The belt cards have indicator LED’s and adjustment screws as shown.

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Belt card adjustment may be required for component wear or replacement.  If the belt cards were swapped for troubleshooting, and not put back where they came from, adjustments could be off.

ADJUSTING CARD SETTINGS

The following outlines the adjustment of the four adjustable values of the belt cards.  All values INCREASE by turning CLOCKWISE.

Ramp Adjustments

“Ramp Up” controls the time it takes the belt to accelerate to its set speed, and “Ramp Down” controls the time it takes the belt to decelerate to a stop. Adjustment is from 0 –5 seconds.  Care must be taken if adjustment is made, since it is possible to have the feeder in a ramp cycle while the main is not running.

Factory setting:

1. Decrease all ramp screws (counterclockwise) to zero

2. Set ramp down on both cards to two full turns open (clockwise)

3. Set main ramp up to four full turns open (clockwise)

4.Set feeder ramp up to six full turns open (clockwise)

To be sure which way to turn the screws, remove a card and look at the adjustable resistor connected to the screws.  Turn the screws counterclockwise so the sliding “slugs” in the resistors move to the end away from the black face plate of the card. There are no stops, so there is no way to turn too far.  This is the zero point in step 1.

Max

The gain “MAX” screw adjusts the gain of the belt speed knobs.  To check these adjustments, time the belts while running them at full speed with the manual by-pass.  Next, run the belts with the remote to see if the same speed is reached.  If the belt is slower, increasing the gain will speed the belt up.

STOP increasing the setting when the belt doesn’t go any faster.  You can determine this by timing the belt, or just go by the sound of the belt.  Turning the gain screw up too far narrows the adjustment “window” on the belt speed knobs.  Therefore, if you have a belt that doesn’t run until “3” or “4,” and full speed is reached at “6” or “7,” set the knob at “10” and decrease the gain setting until the belt starts to slow down.  This will open the “window” back up.

Zero

The zero screw calibrates the position of the feedback sensor.  Whenever the e-stop circuit is reset, the LED’s on the belt motor controllers will be on.  The ZERO setting positions the valves so that the belts are not running.

If the ZERO is too high, the belts can “creep” or run slowly when the belt switches are off.  Pushing an e-stop will stop the belts.  With the e-stop reset, adjust by turning the ZERO screw counterclockwise toward “-“, 1/8 turn at a time, until the belt stops.

If the ZERO is too low, a speed setting of “2” or “3” might be required to get the belt to move.  Increase the ZERO setting until the belt just starts, then back off until it stops again.  Subsequent adjustments might be necessary, due to change in resistance from the rollers, scrapers or skirts.

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How Do I Replace My Telescope Cable?

The telescope cable on the main belt won’t last forever. Two to three years is about it, depending on your cleanliness, maintenance and location (winter chemicals can speed the aging process). Equalizer cables last much longer and do not require the tension a main cable needs to effectively do its job.

Cables are fairly easy to replace, unless they have broken. For complete instructions on the TB 105 and TB 130 telescope cable, download the Summer 2003 PDF, Tips on Replacing the Telescopic Drive Cable (PMA-0010-6 TB). Use ONLY Putzmeister authorized cables. Some types of cable (i.e., non-rotating) are unsuitable.

When replacing the main cable, inspect all sheaves. The eight-inch (203mm) sheaves mounted horizontally will wear out on their lower edge first, so check your Operator’s Manual as some can be turned over before replacement is necessary. If the effective diameter has been reduced, cables will contact end frames. Best practices indicate having two sets of eight-inch (203mm) sheaves and bearings, as well as one set of 10-inch (254mm) sheaves and bearings, available when replacing cables, just in case.

TB 105, TB 110, TB 130, TB 600

Visually inspect cables as part of your daily operational routine. First, fully extend the boom. Then, lock out the machine and walk along under the cables.

Lubricate the cables with a penetrating chain and cable lube. The cable has a wire rope core, and penetration is critical. DO NOT use any products with graphite, as it softens plastic slides on the boom.

• Assess the wraps on the telescope drive with care. Also check the cable running from the anchor point (Dead Head) of the telescope drive, out to the tip section end frame and back to the drive sheaves.

Maintain telescope cables at 2,500 psi (172 bar) with the tensioning jacks. If you are between holes at 2,500 psi (172 bar), go to the next higher hole.

Watch for signs of a loose main cable during operation. This could mean that there is too much sag in a fully extended cable, or drive sheaves spinning in the cable wraps. Spinning drives create heat, which shortens the life of the cables.

Replace the cable as soon as possible if ANY broken strands are observed. Cable failure occurs shortly after broken strands are observed.

Why Should Your Telebelt Always Wear a Skirt?

Tunnel skirts act as a funnel to direct the flow of material from the feeder belt to the main conveyor. The TB 105, TB 110 and TB 130 all have tunnel skirts, or transfer tunnels located at the feeder transfer. Tunnel skirts are invaluable in ensuring that the flow from the feeder through the transfer and onto the main belt is smooth for more efficient material placement, a cleaner job site and easier cleanup at the end of a job. Due to its design, which incorporates a transfer hopper, the TB 80 is the only Telebelt that doesn’t need a tunnel skirt.

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TB 105 Skirts:

  • Are adjustable as needed by tying the skirts back. This is made simple by using rope or bungee cords to tie the tunnel skirt’s handles back to the transfer stand tubes.
  • Do not require hold-down springs to prevent leaks because the material used is heavy enough to provide a sufficient seal with the belts.

TB 110 and TB 130 Skirts:

  • Can be adjusted in or out, depending on the type of material being conveyed, to expose more or less of the conveyor to carry material away from the feeder transfer. Adjust in for a more narrow exposure when conveying wet concrete, and adjust out for a wide exposure when conveying dry concrete or fill material.
  • Feature easy adjustment by moving the tunnels in or out on two sets of mounting brackets. This can be done in about 10 minutes without the need for any tools.
  • Use hold-down springs to make a seal with the belts that prevents any leakage of material being conveyed.

What Do Boom Covers Actually Do?

Boom covers are a factory-installed standard feature on the main conveyor belt of all Telebelt models and must be used at all times. They prevent material from leaking down onto the return side of the belt or into the structural parts of the boom. Boom covers are located on the base section of the Telebelt, or arm one.

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Why Are Boom Covers So Important?

  • Failure to use your boom cover can result in rock bounce if the belt is set to run too fast, causing rocks to fall through and ride the return side of the belt. This will ultimately punch holes in the belt and dramatically shorten its lifespan.
  • Boom covers prevent large rocks from getting stuck in the roller cradles, ensuring that when the boom retracts, trapped rocks do not bend the roller cradles.

TECH NOTE – BOOM COVERS

To determine if you need to replace your boom cover, stand under the base section and look up. If you see daylight between the boom cover and the main conveyor, it’s time to replace the boom cover. Please contact Putzmeister Customer Support at 1-800-890-0269.